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Oct. 6, 2022, 5:48 a.m.
'There's lots to buy in China,' fund manager says and names these 2 EV stocks
'There's lots to buy in China,' fund manager says and names these 2 EV stocks
['Energy', 'Eve', 'CATL', 'company', 'year']

The Shanghai Composite Index has fallen by 17% this year and is down around 10% over the past five years. Edmund Harriss, head of Asian and emerging market investments at Guinness Asset Management... #batterymakers #batteries #guinnessassetmanagement #eveener…

'There's lots to buy in China,' fund manager says and names these 2 EV stocks

The Shanghai Composite Index has fallen by 17% this year and is down around 10% over the past five years. Chinese companies CATL and Eve Energy will set up battery manufacturing plants in Europe. Shares for CATL, the world's largest EV battery maker, have fallen by 30% this year. Eve Energy has seen its share price decline by 25% thisyear but is up by 530%. "I seem to be a bit out of step with the rest of the market," a fund manager says. Eve Energy and CATL make up 5.65% of the KARS ETF, which is available to both U.S. and U.K. investors. Eve Energy is a publicly traded energy company based in New York City. CATL is a privately-held, publicly-traded energy company.

Oct. 6, 2022, 5:04 a.m.
G7 counters China's Belt and Road Initiative to curb its global influence
G7 counters China's Belt and Road Initiative to curb its global influence
['China', 'country', 'Sri', 'Lanka', 'PGII']

China tried to project itself as a helping hand to developing countries in the case of economic development through its Belt and Road Initiative but only just to lure them into their debt trap

G7 counters China's Belt and Road Initiative to curb its global influence

ALSO READ China Belt & Road spend in Russia, Sri Lanka falls to zero: Report China's debt trap diplomacy responsible for economic calamity in Sri Lanka China used 'debt trap diplomacy' to gain control over Sri Lanka: Think tank US seeks to add India as 6th nation for NATO plus, says lawmaker Ro Khanna Zelenskyy to attend NATO summit in Madrid from June 28 to 29: Report. Tried to project itself as a helping hand to developing countries in the case of infrastructure and economic development through its Belt and Road Initiative but only just to lure them into their debt trap. Looking at the geopolitical developments, the - which includes the United States, Canada, Italy, the UK, France, Germany, and Japan along with the European Union - have introduced the Partnership for Global Infrastructure and Investment, an alternative mechanism for the developing world which can replace, or at least lessen, the adverse impact of China's BRI. The central purpose of the PGII initiative is to provide funding to the countries in need of critical infrastructure, including roads, bridges, ports as well as communication facilities. Author Fabbri quoting US National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan said, "(We) do think that there is increasing convergence, both at the and NATO, around the challenge China poses and around the need - the urgent need for consultation and especially alignment among the world's leading market democracies to deal with some of those challenges". Unlike Chinese projects plagued by low cost, loose standards, and hurried timelines, the PGII initiative can be a major win for global welfare and sustainable development, with its emphasis on human infrastructure at the core of global development ambitions. According to the China Daily, Beijing believes that the PGII is launched to compete against China. Beijing is skeptical regarding the outcomes of the PGII and affirms that other countries including the G7 should join China's BRI. PGII is an indication that Chinese investments, after a flurry of deals in the last few years world over, are now receiving pushback from many countries.

Oct. 6, 2022, 4:37 a.m.
What's behind the sudden increase in missile tests from North Korea?
What's behind the sudden increase in missile tests from North Korea?
['North', 'missile', 'test', 'Korean', 'Pyongyang']

With six launches in 12 days, North Korea is flexing its muscles and taking advantage of geopolitical turmoil across the worldMillions of residents of northern Japan will have felt a sense of deja vu on Tuesday morning when they were alerted to a North Korean…

What's behind the sudden increase in missile tests from North Korea?

Millions of residents of northern Japan will have felt a sense of deja vu on Tuesday morning when they were alerted to a North Korean missile flying overhead. Five years earlier, they had twice been shaken from their slumber by Japanese government warnings to seek shelter after missile launches by Pyongyang. North Korea has fired another ballistic missile, South says. As is the case with every other major display of North Korean military might, timing and context are as important as any indication that the regime's weapons are becoming more technologically advanced - and more threatening. The consensus among Pyongyang watchers was that the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, would avoid taking any action that could steal the regional limelight from China - the North's main ally and biggest aid donor - as it prepares to hold a rare Communist party congress on 16 October. The war in Ukraine has not only become a distraction for Joe Biden, it has opened the door to closer ties between Pyongyang and Moscow, while recent Chinese military activity in the Taiwan Strait has enabled the North to exploit rising tensions between Washington and Beijing. As the Centre for Strategic and International Studies noted this week, previous sequences of North Korean ballistic missile tests have been followed by a nuclear test. "We are in a cycle of weapons provocations. What's left, essentially, is an intercontinental ballistic missile test and potentially the long-awaited seventh nuclear test."

Oct. 6, 2022, 4:34 a.m.
China's vast Xinjiang hit with COVID-19 travel restrictions
China's vast Xinjiang hit with COVID-19 travel restrictions
['Xinjiang', 'China', 'region', 'leader', 'over']

Sprawling Xinjiang is the latest Chinese region to be hit with sweeping COVID-19 travel restrictions, as China further ratchets up control measures ahead of a key Communist Party congress later this month

China's vast Xinjiang hit with COVID-19 travel restrictions

Sprawling Xinjiang is the latest Chinese region to be hit with sweeping COVID-19 travel restrictions, as China further ratchets up control measures ahead of a key Communist Party congress later this month. The National Health Commission announced just 93 cases in Xinjiang on Wednesday and 97 on Thursday, all of them asymptomatic. Xinjiang leaders on Tuesday conceded problems with detection and control measures but offered no word on when they planned to lift the restrictions. Officials are desperate not to be called out for new outbreaks in their regions and Xinjiang has been under special scrutiny over the government's establishment of a series of prison-like re-education centers in which Muslim minorities have been taught to renounce their religion and allegedly subjected to a range of human rights abuses. Xinjiang's vast surveillance system, relying on ubiquitous checkpoints, facial and even voice recognition software, and universal cell phone monitoring has made controlling travel among the population especially easy. Last month, a nighttime bus crash that killed 27 people who were being forcefully moved to a mass quarantine location in southwestern China set off a storm of anger online over the harshness of the policy. Last week, residents in the western region of Xinjiang said they went hungry during a more than 40-day lockdown.

Oct. 6, 2022, 4:29 a.m.
Zero-Covid in China key to Xi Jinping's legacy as he eyes third term
Zero-Covid in China key to Xi Jinping's legacy as he eyes third term
['China', 'people', 'Covid', 'policy', 'zero-Covid']

His zero-tolerance approach to Covid has become synonymous with the efforts to cement his authority over China and its ruling Communist Party (CCP).

Zero-Covid in China key to Xi Jinping's legacy as he eyes third term

Beijing, Oct 6, 2022 -For many in China, years of gruelling lockdowns and privacy invasions aimed at extinguishing Covid have caused misery. His zero-tolerance approach to Covid has become synonymous with the efforts to cement his authority over China and its ruling Communist Party. Xi has dug in his heels, declaring zero-Covid China's most "Economic and effective" path forward, while maintaining policies that have deepened the state's control over the lives of its 1.4 billion people. Steve Tsang, director of the SOAS China Institute at the University of London, said the Covid-monitoring apparatus was "In line with the model of social control" spearheaded by Xi. - 'No choice' - China argues zero-Covid places human life above material concerns and has helped to avert the public health crises seen in other countries. China has reported just over 5,000 Covid deaths compared with more than a million in the United States. "There is this mentality that we did such a wonderful job in 2020 and 2021... if we do nothing and a huge number of people get infected, that basically gives away all you have achieved," he told AFP. Many in China speak favourably of zero-Covid, with Fu of the Brookings Institution saying state propaganda had convinced most people of the need to cut cases "At all human and economic costs". Airline engineer Ian Jiang has spent 200 days in isolation hotels throughout the pandemic, and China continues to enforce quarantines for overseas arrivals of up to two weeks.

Oct. 6, 2022, 3:36 a.m.
India, Indonesia debt outperforms China despite global selloff
India, Indonesia debt outperforms China despite global selloff
['bond', 'India', 'rate', 'yields', 'Asia']

The two countries’ sovereign debt only lost 0.4% and 1.5% respectively for dollar-based investors in the third quarter, less than other emerging markets in Asia including China, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. They knocked China off the top spot as…

India, Indonesia debt outperforms China despite global selloff

The two countries' sovereign debt only lost 0.4% and 1.5% respectively for dollar-based investors in the third quarter, less than other emerging markets in Asia including China, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Indian and Indonesian bonds are offering shelter from extreme volatility in global markets. "Amid the global selloff in the third quarter, the higher yields on Indonesia and India bonds have provided a bigger offset to bond price losses," said Duncan Tan, a rates strategist at DBS Group Holdings Ltd. Indian and Indonesian notes have the widest spreads in emerging Asia, helping to shield investors from the turmoil in US Treasuries, which had the longest string of quarterly losses in almost a decade. "Relative resiliency in their currencies was also key, with the rupiah continuing to benefit from the commodity tailwind and the rupee supported by larger Reserve Bank of India intervention," Singapore-based Tan added. Local dynamics have played an important role in supporting the outperformance of India and Indonesia debt. India's notes have been supported by foreign inflows and signs that the market is nearing the peak in the rate hike cycle. Another positive is the prospect of inclusion into global indexes, although JPMorgan Chase & Co. said this week it would hold off from adding India bonds to its EM sovereign bond index for now.

Oct. 6, 2022, 3:21 a.m.
Palau says committed to supporting Taiwan despite 'mounting aggressions'
Palau says committed to supporting Taiwan despite 'mounting aggressions'
['Taiwan', 'Palau', 'TAIPEI', 'Pacific', 'Whipps']

The president of Palau said on Thursday that his small Pacific island nation is committed to supporting Taiwan despite "mounting aggressions", offering his strong backing at a time Beijing is ramping up pressure against Taipei in the region.

Palau says committed to supporting Taiwan despite 'mounting aggressions'

TAIPEI, Oct 6 - The president of Palau said on Thursday that his small Pacific island nation is committed to supporting Taiwan despite "Mounting aggressions", offering his strong backing at a time Beijing is ramping up pressure against Taipei in the region. Palau, which has a population of fewer than 20,000 people and is a close U.S. ally, is one of only 14 countries to maintain formal diplomatic ties with Chinese-claimed Taiwan. "The people of Palau deeply value the friendship between our two nations and are committed to supporting Taiwan despite the mounting aggressions in our region," Whipps said, standing next to Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen. Taiwan has faced increased military pressure from China, especially since Beijing staged war games near the island in August after a visit to Taipei by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. "Taiwan greatly appreciates Palau's friendship," she said. China says Taiwan is one of its provinces with no right to state-to-state ties, which the democratically-elected government in Taipei strongly refutes. Taiwan provides development aid to Palau, including healthcare.

Oct. 6, 2022, 3:14 a.m.
Taiwan sees more Chinese coercion, intimidation in Xi's next term
Taiwan sees more Chinese coercion, intimidation in Xi's next term
['Taiwan', 'China', 'Beijing', 'Party', 'Chiu']

Taiwan expects China to increase its coercion and intimidation to achieve its goal of bringing the island under Beijing's control once President Xi Jinping assumes a third term in office, a senior Taiwanese minister said on Thursday.

Taiwan sees more Chinese coercion, intimidation in Xi's next term

TAIPEI, Oct 6 - Taiwan expects China to increase its coercion and intimidation to achieve its goal of bringing the island under Beijing's control once President Xi Jinping assumes a third term in office, a senior Taiwanese minister said on Thursday. Beijing's once-in-five years leadership reshuffle is set for the Communist Party congress that starts Oct. 16, where Xi is poised to break with precedent and secure a third leadership term. China views democratically governed Taiwan as its own territory and has ramped up military and political pressure to assert sovereignty claims, including staging war games near the island in August after U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi visited Taipei. Speaking to lawmakers, Chiu Tai-san, the head of Taiwan's China-policy making Mainland Affairs Council, said Xi will further consolidate his power at the party congress. China will do this by using "Coercion and intimidation", "Grey zone" activities and international law to "Interfere with and hinder Taiwan's interaction and cooperation with the international community to achieve its goals towards Taiwan", Chiu said. China has never renounced the use of force to bring Taiwan under its control, but has also pledged to work for peaceful "Reunification" with Taiwan under a "One country, two systems" model. China's Taiwan Affairs Office did not answer calls seeking comment.

Oct. 6, 2022, 3:04 a.m.
China finance ministry to issue an extra 5.5 bln yuan of treasury bonds in Hong Kong
China finance ministry to issue an extra 5.5 bln yuan of treasury bonds in Hong Kong
['bonds', 'worth', 'yuan', 'billion', 'rate']

China's finance ministry said on Thursday that it will issue an additional 5.5 billion yuan ($773.18 million) worth of yuan-denominated sovereign bonds in Hong Kong on Oct. 12.

China finance ministry to issue an extra 5.5 bln yuan of treasury bonds in Hong Kong

HONG KONG, Oct 6 - China's finance ministry said on Thursday that it will issue an additional 5.5 billion yuan worth of yuan-denominated sovereign bonds in Hong Kong on Oct. 12. The ministry said it would issue an extra 3.5 billion yuan worth of bonds due 2024 with an interest rate of 2.44% per annum, and an additional 2.0 billion yuan worth of 2027 bonds carrying an interest rate of 2.75%. .

Oct. 6, 2022, 3:02 a.m.
Secretive chip startup may help Huawei circumvent US sanctions
Secretive chip startup may help Huawei circumvent US sanctions
['company', 'Huawei', 'PXW', 'technology', 'supply']

Huawei is expected to buy most, if not all, of its output, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing private information. PXW, as the company is known, plans to take delivery of the gear as early as the first half of 2023, one of the people s…

Secretive chip startup may help Huawei circumvent US sanctions

08:32 AM IST. When the US government blacklisted Huawei Technologies Co. as a national security threat, it cut the Chinese company off from buying American semiconductors and other critical technologies. If it succeeds in getting off the ground, the startup could effectively enable Huawei to sidestep Washington's efforts to choke off the flow of chips to a company it views as a military and economic threat. The US government is moving beyond blacklisting individual companies like Huawei and Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp. in favor of broad restrictions on all Chinese companies, including a ban on purchases of artificial-intelligence chips. "Although Huawei does not own any manufacturing facilities for now, it is going to be one of the most important companies in driving China's semi industry due to its products in end-markets such as networking, artificial intelligence computation, cloud, smartphones, IoT and auto," Tammy Qiu, an analyst at Berenberg, wrote in the report in September. The market for chipmaking equipment is dominated by five companies - the Netherlands' ASML and Japan's Tokyo Electron, as well as the US's Applied Materials Inc., KLA Corp. and Lam Research Corp. All of them are subject to complicated regulations that restrict what they can sell to Huawei and other Chinese customers. US companies can't sell anything to Huawei without a special license. Non-American companies like ASML and Tokyo Electron are in murky territory when it comes to companies blacklisted by the US, like Huawei.

Oct. 6, 2022, 3 a.m.
Carmakers Circle as Vale Weighs Selling a Stake in Metals Unit
Carmakers Circle as Vale Weighs Selling a Stake in Metals Unit
['nickel', 'mine', 'supply', 'new', 'Vale']

Electric vehicles may not use fossil fuels, but they guzzle up other precious resources buried deep in the Earth's crust that have been harder to...

Carmakers Circle as Vale Weighs Selling a Stake in Metals Unit

Rio de Janeiro-based metals giant Vale is looking to sell a $2.5 billion minority stake in its mining operations for copper and nickel, two key ingredients for EV batteries, the Financial Times reported Wednesday. The battle for nickel, the material expected to face the largest absolute increase in demand of all the battery metals, is political as the two nations that dominate the market butt heads with the rest of the world. Over 60% of the world's nickel mines are Chinese-owned, analysts tell the FT, while over 80% of nickel processing is based in China. Russia supplies about 16% of the world's high-grade nickel, leading to a massive surge in prices in the wake of the war in Ukraine. Vale, the largest nickel supplier outside of China, has hired Goldman Sachs to unlock value for the division - which owns both copper and nickel mines in Canada and Indonesia - and raise capital to ramp up mining activities. Earlier this year Tesla agreed to a long-term deal to buy nickel from Vale mines in Canada. Elon Musk has offered his two cents, saying that securing a consistent supply of nickel is one of the biggest challenges facing Tesla and that he would hand out "Giant contracts" to miners who can collect it "Efficiently and in an environmentally sensitive way."

Oct. 6, 2022, 2:06 a.m.
Paris club approaches China, India for Sri Lanka debt overhaul
Paris club approaches China, India for Sri Lanka debt overhaul
['creditor', 'club', 'Sri', 'Lanka', 'official']

The club, an informal group of mostly rich, western bilateral creditors, is awaiting a response from both countries after it sent an official request in late August to work together, said an official who declined to be identified because talks are continuing.

Paris club approaches China, India for Sri Lanka debt overhaul

Paris Club creditors reached out to China and India to coordinate Sri Lanka's debt-restructuring talks, according to a person familiar with the matter, in an attempt to bring major global creditors together to rework the obligations of emerging economies. Coordinating on Sri Lanka may result in the formation of an official creditors committee or simply holding regular meetings to share information on debt treatment, the official said. An Asian diplomat in Colombo, Sri Lanka's capital, confirmed that the Paris Club had been in contact with the country's non-Paris Club creditors. The formation of an official creditors committee in which China and India agreed to work together with the Paris Club would help Sri Lanka secure a $2.9 billion bailout from the International Monetary Fund. Last month, the Paris Club reiterated its willingness to coordinate with non-Paris Club official bilateral creditors "To provide the necessary financing assurances in a timely manner." The framework may provide a model for Sri Lanka in its debt overhaul by bringing bilateral creditors around the same negotiating table. "When you moved from a negotiating framework that involved simply Paris Club and commercial creditor representative committees and you added the non-Paris Club bilaterals - China - it became three-dimensional chess," Lee Buchheit, a veteran of two dozen debt restructurings who's been consulted by the Sri Lankan government, said in a Sept. 14 webinar.

Oct. 6, 2022, 1:30 a.m.
Elon Musk’s everything app ‘X’ sounds a lot like China’s WeChat
Elon Musk’s everything app ‘X’ sounds a lot like China’s WeChat
['WeChat', 'service', 'Twitter', 'app', 'Musk']

Elon Musk didn’t provide many details beyond a one-line tweet. But the Tesla Inc. impresario has openly admired the Tencent Holdings Ltd. app that’s grown from a messaging service to a mini-internet used daily by more than a billion Chinese.

Elon Musk’s everything app ‘X’ sounds a lot like China’s WeChat

07:00 AM IST. Elon Musk has teased something called "X, the everything app" after he buys Twitter Inc. Based on the billionaire's past comments, that service could look a lot like Chinese super-app WeChat. He's mused aloud about making Twitter more useful, indicating he wants it to be more like WeChat and TikTok, the video-sharing service owned by ByteDance Ltd. that's taken off across the US. And he's drawn parallels to so-called super apps common in parts of Asia, letting people use a single smartphone application for a range of services from communications to summoning a car. Buying Twitter is an accelerant to creating X, the everything app. A true super-app, hundreds of millions use WeChat daily to book rides, make dining reservations, order food. WeChat is a fintech titan, one of China's biggest payments and online finance networks. In short, WeChat functions as an all-in-one service - combining the uses of apps like Facebook, Twitter, Uber, Instagram and Substack. At Tesla's annual shareholder meeting in August, Musk stressed that he uses Twitter a lot and that he has ideas on ways to make the platform "Radically better." He compared his ambitions for Twitter with the vision he had for X, a financial services company he co-founded in 1999.

Oct. 6, 2022, 1:20 a.m.
Nationalist fervour ratcheted up in lead up to China's communist party congress
Nationalist fervour ratcheted up in lead up to China's communist party congress
['party', 'Struggle', 'country', 'political', 'lead']

Senior Communist Party officials present a united front, quashing internet rumours of a coupChinese authorities are ratcheting up nationalistic sentiment in the run up to a key meeting of the country’s ruling party where party leader Xi Jinping is expected to…

Nationalist fervour ratcheted up in lead up to China's communist party congress

Chinese authorities are ratcheting up nationalistic sentiment in the run up to a key meeting of the country's ruling party where party leader Xi Jinping is expected to gain an unprecedented third term. In recent weeks, state media has amplified the patriotic themes of "Struggle" and "Red heritage" while warning of internal and external threats ahead of the Chinese Communist party's most important political meeting. Exhibitions have been held at many "Red heritage" sites across the country, telling the story of how the Communist party fought and won the civil war in the 1940s. In the Museum of the Communist party of China, large portraits of Xi that harked back to images of Mao as a supreme leader featured prominently. In the latest issue of the Communist party journal Qiushi, Xi stressed the need to "Struggle" and bolster the "Combat capability" of the party through leadership in politics and ideology. The article is part of a speech Xi made to the last party congress in 2017, republished on the 1 October National Day. Analysts say it has set the tone for the upcoming party congress and indicates a continuation of Xi's current political line.

Oct. 6, 2022, 1:11 a.m.
Will North Korea conduct a nuclear test during China's Congress?
Will North Korea conduct a nuclear test during China's Congress?
['North', 'Korea', 'test', 'China', 'nuclear']

Expectations grow that Pyongyang may soon test a nuclear weapon — and its relations with its closest ally.

Will North Korea conduct a nuclear test during China's Congress?

When North Korea carried out its last nuclear test on September 3, 2017, China's President Xi Jinping was preparing to host the leaders of Brazil, Russia, India and South Africa at a summit meant to burnish his image as a global statesperson ahead of a critical Chinese Communist Party congress. Kim Jong Un, North Korea's leader, has accelerated the pace of his country's nuclear and missiles weapons development this year, personally overseeing the launch of hypersonic and intercontinental ballistic missiles, and enacting a new law that allows for preemptive atomic strikes if an imminent attack against North Korean strategic assets and its leadership is detected. Among North Korea watchers, there is now a sense of déjà vu as warnings of a seventh North Korean nuclear test intensify just as China's ruling Communist Party prepares for its five-yearly congress this month, where Xi is expected to be appointed to an unprecedented third term. "It has been expected that North Korea will try to refrain from provocations until the CCP Congress ends. That expectation has been shattered now with North Korea's Intermediate-Range Ballistic Missile test," said Ellen Kim, senior fellow at the US-based Center for Strategic and International Studies, referring to the missile over Japan. Analysts were also divided about whether and how China would respond in the event of a seventh North Korean nuclear test. Lee believes a North Korean nuclear test may be likely even earlier than the CCP Congress, perhaps around October 10, the anniversary of the founding of North Korea's Workers Party. "If Kim Jong Un does carry out a nuclear test around October 10, then the Chinese will be irritated. But they will move on. They have a more important event to hold. So North Korea's nuclear test and insult perhaps to China and to everyone else will be forgotten, there will be no repercussions," he said, noting that Beijing has failed to take action against North Korea despite a record number of weapons tests this year.

Oct. 6, 2022, 12:50 a.m.
Elon Musk says he wants to make an 'everything app', but what is it?
Elon Musk says he wants to make an 'everything app', but what is it?
['app', 'Musk', 'super', 'Twitter', 'service']

Elon Musk says buying Twitter will be an "accelerant" to developing X, his "everything app". Here's what you need to know.

Elon Musk says he wants to make an 'everything app', but what is it?

The purchase would be an "Accelerant" for X - the "Everything app", he said. What is an everything app, and what does it do? What is a super app? A super app, or what Mr Musk refers to as an "Everything app", has been described as the Swiss army knife of mobile apps, with a suite of services including messaging, social networking, peer-to-peer payments and e-commerce shopping. Scott Galloway, a New York University professor of marketing and co-host of tech podcast Pivot, wrote last year that mega apps were already massively popular in Asia, where mobile phones were the main portal to the internet. What are some examples of super apps? Chinese super app WeChat has more than 1 billion monthly users, according to one estimate. Why does Musk want to make a super app? In a question-and-answer session with Twitter employees in June, Mr Musk said he saw an opportunity to make an app like WeChat. Adding more tools and services to Twitter could also help the billionaire reach his lofty goal to expand the app's number of users from 237 million to "At least a billion".

Oct. 6, 2022, 12:43 a.m.
Smaller funds cold to India's inclusion in global bond indices
Smaller funds cold to India's inclusion in global bond indices
['India', 'global', 'fund', 'investors', 'indices']

Such standalone entities, unlike global financial heavyweights familiar with India's capital markets and its regulatory environment, believe the burden of regulatory compliance might outweigh the rewards. If they come to India, they will have to first registe…

Smaller funds cold to India's inclusion in global bond indices

Mumbai: Reluctance among smaller asset managers and funds in Europe and the US to register themselves locally as foreign portfolio investors is the primary reason behind the deferral of India's inclusion in global bond indices, people familiar with the matter told ET. Such standalone entities, unlike global financial heavyweights familiar with India's capital markets and its regulatory environment, believe the burden of regulatory compliance might outweigh the rewards. "Those smaller index constituents are not willing to back India's inclusion in the JPMorgan global bond index, vetoing the proposal in effect," one of the persons cited above told ET. Heavyweight Investors, Funds Back India Entry Every constituent's voice counts when such important decisions involving the global indices are taken. Are said to be in favour of India's inclusion in the indices, a move that could ensure potential inflows of up to$30 billion into Indian fixed-income securities. These top global funds have been deploying money in India across asset classes, and are quite familiar with local regulations. JPMorgan, which runs one of the keenly tracked global indices, declined to comment on the matter. While Russia's exclusion in the aftermath of Western sanctions has created space for a new entrant into the indices, growing concentration risk involving the Chinese bond markets has helped burnish New Delhi's allure with global investors. Ample LiquidityIndia's inclusion is expected to begin through an onshore route where a set of 22 government debt securities will be made available to international bond investors via the Fully Accessible Route, a bespoke window that permits non-residents to invest without any ceiling.

Oct. 6, 2022, 12:06 a.m.
Localization and China's Tech Success on Two Continents
Localization and China's Tech Success on Two Continents
['website', 'Global', 'policy', 'Center']

Join Carnegie for a conversation about how local players have fared in three Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian countries-Algeria, Egypt, and Indonesia-in pushing Chinese technology firms to meet their developmental needs.

Localization and China's Tech Success on Two Continents

By using this website, you agree to our cookie policy. Please note... You are leaving the website for the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy and entering a website for another of Carnegie's global centers.

Oct. 5, 2022, 11:43 p.m.
Chinese 'Zero-Covid' zealots in hazmat suits point MACHINE GUNS at frightened families
Chinese 'Zero-Covid' zealots in hazmat suits point MACHINE GUNS at frightened families
['Covid', 'China', 'report', 'Professor', 'lab']

Guards in hazmat gear were seen pointing machine guns at frightened families as they locked down the Xishuangbanna airport in Yunnan, China.

Chinese 'Zero-Covid' zealots in hazmat suits point MACHINE GUNS at frightened families

The Lancet, one of the world's most prestigious medical journals, has sensationally claimed Covid may have leaked out of a US lab. Professor David Robertson, director of the University of Glasgow's Centre for Virus Research, said while there were still answers needed on Covid's there was zero basis for US involvement. Professor Sachs said he stood by his previous comments and he personally oversaw the part of the paper dealing with the emergence of Covid. China itself has faced several accusations of covering up the origins of Covid. Researchers who fell ill with a mysterious flu-like virus months before the official Covid timeline were reportedly silenced or disappeared. A disinformation campaign launched by the Chinese Government last year claimed Covid originated from an American military base in Maryland. In June, UK Government sources claimed the head of the World Health Organisation privately believed Covid started following a leak in China.

Oct. 5, 2022, 11:42 p.m.
GOP Lawmakers Worry About China Ties of Election Software Company Accused of Stealing Data
GOP Lawmakers Worry About China Ties of Election Software Company Accused of Stealing Data
['election', 'Konnech', 'company', 'worker', 'information']

Criminal charges in California against the chief executive of a software company said to be tied to China have sparked national concerns about election security. ... Read More The post GOP Lawmakers Worry About China Ties of Election Software Company Accused …

GOP Lawmakers Worry About China Ties of Election Software Company Accused of Stealing Data

Criminal charges in California against the chief executive of a software company said to be tied to China have sparked national concerns about election security. Eugene Yu, founder and president of the election software company Konnech Inc., was arrested by local police in Michigan in connection with an investigation into the possible theft of personal identifying information for election workers in Los Angeles County. "Allegations that the personal data of election workers was criminally mishandled by a company involved in the administration of elections raise deep concerns both for the privacy of Americans and for the integrity of our elections," Rep. Claudia Tenney, R-N. Y., co-chairman of the House Election Integrity Caucus, told The Daily Signal in a written statement. Konnech had a $2.9 million, five-year contract to supply and maintain the software used in managing Los Angeles County election poll workers. Konnech, based in Michigan, develops software to manage election logistics such as scheduling poll workers. At the top of its landing page, the website says: "Streamline your election management process and save your staff time and money with our industry leading software products." For nearly 20 years we have been refining our software solutions based on the feedback and advice from the election managers we partner with and can confidently say that our technology is among the most effective, nuanced, and cost-saving in the industry.

Oct. 5, 2022, 11:35 p.m.
The farmers caught up in Taiwan's tensions with China
The farmers caught up in Taiwan's tensions with China
['Taiwan', 'China', 'ban', 'pomelo', 'farm']

Taiwanese fruit growers are unable to sell their crop after Beijing banned their importation.

The farmers caught up in Taiwan's tensions with China

The pomelos were due to be picked ahead of the Mid-Autumn Festival, which was celebrated in Taiwan and on mainland China this year on 10 September. The background to this is that, while self-ruled Taiwan sees itself as distinct from the Chinese mainland, with its own democratically-elected government, Beijing sees the island as a breakaway province that will eventually be under its control. China is far and away Taiwan's biggest trading partner, and last year was the destination for 42% of Taiwanese exports, compared to the 15% that went to the US. In the opposite direction, 22% of Taiwan's imports come from China, with only 10% from the US. Much of Taiwan's trade with China is concentrated around Taiwan's electronics and semiconductor industry, which is deeply intertwined with China's tech industry, but DBS Bank economist Ma Tieying says farmers and food companies are particularly exposed to import bans. Separately, China has since 2019 banned people from going to Taiwan on holiday. "Going forward, whether Beijing will roll out more restriction measures need to be closely watched," says Ms Ma. "There is the risk for Beijing to expand import bans to some low-end Taiwanese manufacturing goods such as footwear and wood. In these sectors, Taiwan has high reliance on China for export sales, while China has low reliance on Taiwan for import supply." Christina Lai, a junior research fellow at the Institute of Political Science at Academia Sinica, Taiwan's top research institution, says that Taiwanese farmers are looking for new buyers in Japan, Australia and the Middle East, but that this will take time. Other analysts have started to worry that China might try to blockade Taiwan in the future, as relations between the two sides fall to some of their lowest points in 25 years.

Oct. 5, 2022, 11:34 p.m.
CEO arrested for storing U.S. election info in China
CEO arrested for storing U.S. election info in China
['Konnech', 'Election', 'Vote', 'True', 'work']

On Monday, the New York Times published a story mocking the group True the Vote as "election deniers" for claiming a Michigan-based software company called Konnech was storing personal information about poll workers on servers in China, posing a serious secur…

CEO arrested for storing U.S. election info in China

On Monday, the New York Times published a story mocking the group True the Vote as "Election deniers" for claiming a Michigan-based software company called Konnech was storing personal information about poll workers on servers in China, posing a serious security risk. On Tuesday, the CEO of Konnech, Eugene Yu, was arrested, the Los Angeles Times reported, on allegations he was "Storing critical information that the workers provided on servers in China." Konnech, the New York Times reported, was contracted by Los Angeles County, and Allen County, Indiana, to provide apps for election logistics such as scheduling poll workers. Konnech obtained an ex-parte temporary restraining order in secret, True the Vote said, so the election integrity group would have no opportunity to contest it. "Today, Konnech CEO Eugene Yu was arrested based on alleged evidence of the very activities he and his organization attempted to suppress," True the Vote said. "We will continue to report evidence of threats to our election process," she continued, "And work with law enforcement to ensure our elections are a secure space for all American voters." America still has one sacred institution that dictatorships from Zimbabwe to communist China don't have: ELECTIONS. And in reality, there is no reason, despite the regime's all-out efforts at election rigging, that the tens of millions of decent, right-thinking American voters cannot stop the Biden administration's ever-expanding madness this November.

Oct. 5, 2022, 11 p.m.
China Is Expanding Its Energy Footprint In The Middle East
China Is Expanding Its Energy Footprint In The Middle East
['China', 'Saudi', 'Arabia', 'SCO', 'U.S.']

The recent Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summit saw China enhance its influence with several of the world’s leading players in the oil and gas sector. These included not just the stalwart full SCO members of Russia, Kazakhstan, and India (which was …

China Is Expanding Its Energy Footprint In The Middle East

It is not just enough for China to secure the largest possible pools of oil and gas that it can in the Middle East, which remains the world's largest collective reservoir of such products, but also to secure these at the expense of the U.S., making it a zero-sum game for both countries. First, China itself has continued to use whatever fuel it wants to power its growth, usually at a much cheaper cost than the West's green alternatives, and secondly the lack of building the transitional infrastructure bridge to green energy in the West has made core strategic parts of it - notably, the European Union - beholden to China's great partner in this scheme, Russia. One lesson learned by Xi, it transpires, is the value of offering investment into countries initially and then leveraging this out into extensive political power, as the East India Company successfully did across India, southeast Asia, and east Asia as well, including in Hong Kong and China. The country that China is really after in the Middle East is Saudi Arabia and by signing an MoU with it, via the SCO, for it to become a full dialogue partner for the organisation, China is adding a layer of official organisational credence to what it has been busy doing with Saudi Arabia for years. From this point onwards, MbS has been in China's debt - as were the leaders of countries targeted and similarly helped by the East India Company - and Saudi Arabia's positivity towards China increasing its influence there has followed. Just after China made the offer to MbS to privately buy the entire 5 percent stake in Saudi Aramco that he originally wanted to float, the then-Saudi Vice Minister of Economy and Planning, Mohammed al-Tuwaijri, told a Saudi-China conference in Jeddah that: "We will be very willing to consider funding in renminbi and other Chinese products." He added: "China is by far one of the top markets' to diversify the funding[and] we will also access other technical markets in terms of unique funding opportunities, private placements, panda bonds and others." At these meetings, according to comments at the time from then-Saudi Energy Minister, Khalid al-Falih, it was also decided that Saudi Arabia and China would establish a US$20 billion investment fund on a 50:50 basis that would invest in sectors such as infrastructure, energy, mining, and materials, among other areas.

Oct. 5, 2022, 10:19 p.m.
8 Books to Read Ahead of China's 20th Party Congress
8 Books to Read Ahead of China's 20th Party Congress
['Chinese', 'China', 'Party', 'book', 'Government']

These picks each offer piercing insight into how Chinese politics really works.

8 Books to Read Ahead of China's 20th Party Congress

This week, we round up eight books to read in preparation for the 20th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party, which begins on Oct. 16. For Chinese officials, the run-up to the historic 20th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party is not the time to take a break from politicking. China Brief is taking a break from regular programming to help readers prepare for the Party Congress, which begins on Oct. 16. Although the material conditions of Chinese life have changed radically since Yang's fieldwork in the 1980s, the attitudes she describes persist in the generation who grew up then-including China's 60-something leadership. Localized Bargaining: The Political Economy of China's High-Speed Railway Program by Xiao Ma. Most Chinese officials work for provincial governments rather than the relatively small central government. Perry Link's wide-ranging book An Anatomy of Chinese is speculative and fascinating. Link, the author of one of the best articles ever written about Chinese censorship and politics, is also a brilliant scholar of the Chinese language.

Oct. 5, 2022, 10:04 p.m.
Taiwan says it will not rely on others for defense
Taiwan says it will not rely on others for defense
['Taiwan', 'U.S.', 'Tsai', 'Chinese', 'think']

Taiwan will not rely on others for its defense, President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday, while welcoming a U.S. commitment to the democratically governed island's security during what she called Chinese encroachment on its sovereignty. Tsai's remarks, pre-re…

Taiwan says it will not rely on others for defense

Taiwan will not rely on others for its defense, President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday, while welcoming a U.S. commitment to the democratically governed island's security during what she called Chinese encroachment on its sovereignty. Tsai's remarks, pre-recorded and delivered to a U.S. audience at a Washington forum, come after U.S. President Joe Biden pledged in September to defend Taiwan in the event of any "Unprecedented attack" by China. In her address to the Washington-based Global Taiwan Institute think tank, Tsai thanked the Biden administration and the U.S. Congress for upholding the U.S. commitment to Taiwan's security and for recent U.S. military arms sales. China, which views Taiwan as its own territory, mounted large-scale military drills to display its anger over an August visit there by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Chinese military aircraft have continued routinely crossing the median line in the Taiwan Strait, which had for years acted as an unofficial barrier. James Moriarty, the U.S.-based chairman of the American Institute in Taiwan, Washington's de facto embassy in Taipei, said "Strategic ambiguity" over whether Washington would come to the island's defense had never been stated as policy in any documents. Referring to the decades-old Taiwan Relations Act, which forms the basis of the United States' unofficial ties with Taiwan, he said: "The original documents make it clear that we would have to do something if there is an attempt to change Taiwan's status by force."

Oct. 5, 2022, 9:13 p.m.
American software biz CEO arrested for allegedly storing election data in China
American software biz CEO arrested for allegedly storing election data in China
['Konnech', 'data', 'election', 'company', 'Vote']

LA DA ain't happy about handling of poll workers' info Eugene Yu, CEO of Michigan-based software firm Konnech, has been arrested by police in that US state at the request of the Los Angeles County District Attorney George Gascón, as part of an investigation i…

American software biz CEO arrested for allegedly storing election data in China

The Register asked the LACDAO whether it is alleging that any of the data stored in China was actually accessed by third-parties or made available to them and whether any poll workers have reported abuse of their personal information. Konnech last month sued [PDF] True the Vote, a Texas-based nonprofit and supporter of 2020 election denial, its founder Catherine Engelbrecht, and group member Gregg Phillips, for allegedly defamatory racist and xenophobic attacks on Konnech and Yu that erroneously characterize the company, its founder, and its employees as Chinese government operatives. "Konnech obtains its contracts through transparent public government bidding processes, and has never engaged in bribery or any other criminal activity of any sort. All of Konnech's US customer data is secured and stored exclusively on protected computers located within the United States." At an invitation-only event in August, the complaint says, True the Vote made false accusations about Konnech and claimed "That they have obtained financial and other sensitive personal data of 1.8 million US poll workers - including social security numbers, phone numbers, email addresses, and banking information - from Konnech's protected computers." In a court filing [PDF] last week, Konnech accused the defendants of flouting the TRO by failing to identify who hacked its systems, how its systems were accessed, and who has been given company data. The defendants have evidently provided some sort of information under seal to the judge but have not shared it with Konnech, per the TRO. The filing accuses the defendants of justifying their TRO non-compliance with the claim that "Revealing the identity of the person that allegedly stole Konnech's data has 'significant national security and law enforcement implications'". In a statement published to its website, True the Vote said Konnech has been trying to silence the organization through litigation, and the group's ability to speak has been constrained by the TRO. "Today Konnech CEO Eugene Yu was arrested based on alleged evidence of the very activities he and his organization attempted to suppress," the group said.

Oct. 5, 2022, 8:55 p.m.
Elon Musk Wants to Turn Twitter Into a "Super App" Modeled After China's WeChat
Elon Musk Wants to Turn Twitter Into a "Super App" Modeled After China's WeChat
['app', 'WeChat', 'Twitter', 'Musk', 'Super']

Elon Musk wants to expand Twitter into an "everything app" like China's WeChat that may forever change how people use their smartphones.

Elon Musk Wants to Turn Twitter Into a "Super App" Modeled After China's WeChat

"Buying Twitter is an accelerant to creating X, the everything app," Musk tweeted on Oct. 4 after striking an agreement with Twitter's board to go through with the deal. The world's most well-known super app is perhaps WeChat, operated by Chinese internet giant Tencent. Every day, hundreds of millions of WeChat users send messages, make video calls, share photos and documents, shop, send payments to each other, and even pay utility bills on the app. Musk floated the idea of creating a similar app to WeChat shortly after signing the deal to acquire Twitter. At the All-In Summit 2022 in Miami in May, the Tesla CEO praised WeChat as "Really an excellent app" and "a good model" for Twitter. In March 2019, Mark Zuckerberg said in an interview he wants to shift Facebook users away from public sharing and more toward private conversations-a feature pioneered by WeChat in the early 2010s when it was first launched as a messaging app. In a study on the apps published in April, Insider Intelligence, a market research firm, attributed WeChat's success to two factors: the takeoff of smartphone ownership in China in the early 2010s and a regulatory environment that allows WeChat to integrate thousands of "Mini apps" under its umbrella.

Oct. 5, 2022, 8:31 p.m.
Apple suppliers add factories in California, other US states as China tensions grow
Apple suppliers add factories in California, other US states as China tensions grow
['Apple', 'operations', 'production', 'last', 'year']

As of September 2021, 48 of Apple’s more than 180 suppliers had operations in the US, almost double of the number a year earlier.

Apple suppliers add factories in California, other US states as China tensions grow

Apple suppliers expanded their US operations last year, particularly in California, amid global disruptions to supply chains and rising political tensions with China. As of September 2021, 48 of Apple's more than 180 suppliers had operations in the US, almost double of the number a year earlier. More than 30 sites were located in California, versus less than 10 a year earlier, according to a list of manufacturing sites released by Apple last week. Apple still remains highly dependent on East Asia for its manufacturing, mostly China. Apple's California-based factories are focused more on smaller-scale production lines, test lines for new products, or service-related operations, the report said. To reduce its reliance on China, Apple is also expanding production to Vietnam and India. After launching the iPhone 14 last month, Apple it has taken the production of the new model to India.

Oct. 5, 2022, 8:17 p.m.
U.S. funded Chinese research
U.S. funded Chinese research
['report', 'Chinese', 'research', 'China', 'Army']

Three federal government agencies provided millions of dollars directly to Chinese research centers between 2015 and 2021, according to a report by the congressional watchdog Governmental Accountability Office (GAO).

U.S. funded Chinese research

Three federal government agencies provided millions of dollars directly to Chinese research centers between 2015 and 2021, according to a report by the congressional watchdog Governmental Accountability Office. The Pentagon, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health supplied $28.9 million to Chinese universities and research centers, GAO auditors found. Additional U.S. funds were sent to Chinese research centers through "Subawards" to U.S. and other firms that then supplied the money to China. CDC-funded research in China included work on "Pathogenicity of emerging, re-emerging, and novel viruses and vaccination coverage and effectiveness." The GAO said it could not determine how much of the subawards went to China because of rules that allow awardees to keep data secret. Direct funds were not supplied to the Wuhan Institute of Virology, the Chinese laboratory engaged in risky work of manipulating bat coronaviruses to create strains more infectious to humans, called "Gain of function" research. Critics of the funding have said all U.S. money should be cut off to Chinese research centers until Beijing fully reveals the activities at the Wuhan site. The report said the threats include extreme weather and wildfires, although it was not clear from the report how the weather poses a threat to the service and its mission.

Oct. 5, 2022, 8:10 p.m.
East Lansing CEO arrested for alleged mishandling of L.A. poll worker data
East Lansing CEO arrested for alleged mishandling of L.A. poll worker data
['Konnech', 'election', 'company', 'County', 'data']

L.A. County D.A. George Gascón said Eugene Yu's conduct had "no impact on the tabulation of votes and did not alter election results."

East Lansing CEO arrested for alleged mishandling of L.A. poll worker data

Police have arrested the chief executive of an East Lansing-based software company on suspicion of storing Los Angeles County, California, election workers' data - which his company was contracted to secure and maintain - on servers in China. Los Angeles County is a Konnech client, having utilized PollChief in the most recent election. "Any L. A. County poll worker data that Konnech may have possessed was provided to it by L. A. County, and therefore could not have been 'stolen' as suggested," Goldberg said. According to the release, Konnech had a five-year, $2.9-million contract with Los Angeles County, under which it was supposed to maintain data and allow "Only United States citizens and permanent residents have access to it." With no evidence, election deniers have raised concerns about the company storing information in China, stirring up concerns about Chinese influence on U.S. elections. Judge Kenneth Hoyt of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas granted the company a temporary restraining order against the group, which Konnech alleged committed defamation, caused financial damages and violated the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, among other alleged illegal conduct. "(Their) conduct is not only damaging to Konnech, it also deters other would-be election logistic companies from entering the market-or will cause other such companies to shutter - without which, elections would be unmanageable for cities and counties, leading to further election integrity issues," the complaint says.

Oct. 5, 2022, 8:03 p.m.
U.S. lawmakers slam U.S. corporate executives' Hong Kong trip plans
U.S. lawmakers slam U.S. corporate executives' Hong Kong trip plans
['Kong', 'Hong', 'U.S.', 'sanction', 'Lee']

The Wall Street bankers are accused of ignoring Treasury sanctions against territory’s leader.

U.S. lawmakers slam U.S. corporate executives' Hong Kong trip plans

Smith warned U.S. corporate executives that their future engagement with Hong Kong authorities and its Treasury-sanctioned leader will attract heightened scrutiny in the coming year. Tara Joseph, former president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong, argued Hong Kong propaganda authorities will likely weaponize Lee's presence among senior U.S. banking executives in an effort to whitewash his reputation. "Why do [they] need to go and showboat in Hong Kong now?" asked Joseph, now director of development for the nonprofit Committee for Freedom in Hong Kong foundation. Hong Kong pro-democracy activists say that narrow framing of permissible interactions with Treasury-sanctioned individuals mean that visiting senior corporate executives render Lee and the Hong Kong government implicit approval and reputational boosts just by showing up to hear him speak. "Even if these engagements do not technically violate U.S. sanctions, they show the calculated risks financial institutions are willing to take to appease repressive regimes for profit," said Samuel Chu, president of the nonprofit The Campaign for Hong Kong. As recently as June 2021 Goldman Sachs and Citigroup were on a Hong Kong hiring blitz. "It's not business as usual in Hong Kong, and those companies who do business are going to have to grapple with that uncertainty for the foreseeable future," said Hanscom Smith, former U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong and a senior fellow at Yale's Jackson School of Global Affairs.

Oct. 5, 2022, 8 p.m.
US aims to turn Taiwan into giant weapons depot, officials say
US aims to turn Taiwan into giant weapons depot, officials say
['Taiwan', 'official', 'State', 'weapons', 'China']

American officials are intensifying efforts to build a giant stockpile of weapons in Taiwan after studying recent naval and air force exercises by the Chinese military around the island, according to current and former officials.

US aims to turn Taiwan into giant weapons depot, officials say

The effort to transform Taiwan into a weapons depot faces challenges. US officials are determining the quantity and types of weapons sold to Taiwan by quietly telling Taiwanese officials and American arms makers that they will reject orders for some large systems in favor of a greater number of smaller, more mobile weapons. Biden said last month that US troops would defend Taiwan if China were to carry out an "Unprecedented attack" on the island - the fourth time he has stated that commitment and a shift from a preference for "Strategic ambiguity" on Taiwan among US presidents. US officials increasingly emphasize Taiwan's need for smaller, mobile weapons that can be lethal against Chinese warships and jets while being able to evade attacks, which is central to so-called asymmetric warfare. In a recent article, James Timbie, a former State Department official, and James O. Ellis Jr., a retired US Navy admiral, said that Taiwan needs "a large number of small things" for distributed defense, and that some of Taiwan's recent purchases from the United States, including Harpoon and Stinger missiles, fit that bill. Some senior senators are trying to push through the proposed Taiwan Policy Act, which would provide $6.5 billion in security assistance to Taiwan over the next four years and mandate treating the island as if it were a "Major non-NATO ally." If China decides to establish a naval blockade around Taiwan, American officials would probably study which avenue of resupplying Taiwan - by sea or by air - would offer the least likelihood of bringing Chinese and US ships, aircraft, and submarines into direct conflict.

Oct. 5, 2022, 7:07 p.m.
Chinese Dissidents "frightened" by Ottawa's Inaction Over Chinese Police Stations
Chinese Dissidents "frightened" by Ottawa's Inaction Over Chinese Police Stations
['Chinese', 'Canada', 'police', 'live', 'Frightened']

By Keean Bexte Chinese dissidents are demanding the Canadian government immediately take action following news that Xi Jinping’s communist regime opened police stations in Canada... Chinese Dissidents “frightened” by Ottawa’s Inaction Over Chinese Police Stat…

Chinese Dissidents "frightened" by Ottawa's Inaction Over Chinese Police Stations

Chinese dissidents are demanding the Canadian government immediately take action following news that Xi Jinping's communist regime opened police stations in Canada to do Beijing's dirty work. During a Tuesday hearing of Canada-People's Republic of China Relationship committee, MPs were told Ottawa must introduce legislation to list Chinese police acting on Canadian soil as foreign agents. Co-founder and trustee of Hong Kong Watch, Aileen Calverley, said she's "Frightened" because there are Chinese police where she lives in Milton, Ontario. "Actually, quite a few have opened up in Ontario and one in Markham where I live. The Chinese agents have been around, I think openly," the dissident said. Despite claims that officers are positioned to help Chinese citizens file paperwork, the stations have led to international arrests and forced some to return to their home countries to face prosecution. Calverley claimed that if Chinese police want to act like foreign agents on Canadian soil, they should legally be treated as such. "Canada should have some new legislation because as police from China they should be agents. They're government officials" Calverley said.

Oct. 5, 2022, 7:01 p.m.
The Balance of Power Is Shifting Among Nuclear-Energy Titans
The Balance of Power Is Shifting Among Nuclear-Energy Titans
['cookie', 'website', 'browser', 'device', 'set']

Russia and China have overtaken the United States as the world’s premier nuclear-power exporters. But are they comrades or competitors?

The Balance of Power Is Shifting Among Nuclear-Energy Titans

A cookie is a small piece of data that a website - when visited by a user - asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies - which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting - for our advertising and marketing efforts. We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a "Sale" of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies by using this toggle switch.

Oct. 5, 2022, 7 p.m.
U.S. Aims to Turn Taiwan Into Giant Weapons Depot
U.S. Aims to Turn Taiwan Into Giant Weapons Depot
['Taiwan', 'weapons', 'States', 'United', 'New']

"American officials are intensifying efforts to build a giant stockpile of weapons in Taiwan after studying recent naval and air force exercises by the Chinese military around the island," the New York Times reports."The exercises showed that China would prob…

U.S. Aims to Turn Taiwan Into Giant Weapons Depot

"American officials are intensifying efforts to build a giant stockpile of weapons in Taiwan after studying recent naval and air force exercises by the Chinese military around the island," the New York Times reports. "The exercises showed that China would probably blockade the island as a prelude to any attempted invasion, and Taiwan would have to hold out on its own until the United States or other nations intervened, if they decided to do that." "But the effort to transform Taiwan into a weapons depot faces challenges. The United States and its allies have prioritized sending weapons to Ukraine, which is reducing those countries' stockpiles, and arms makers are reluctant to open new production lines without a steady stream of long-term orders."

Oct. 5, 2022, 6:53 p.m.
Political regulation of Chinese languages
Political regulation of Chinese languages
['Institute', 'Chinese', 'Confucius', 'China', 'language']

The following article was published more than eleven years ago.  I do not recall being aware of it at that time.  It provides a wealth of still relevant information about the state of language affairs in the PRC — including Mandarin vs. the topolects and trad…

Political regulation of Chinese languages

A crucial aspect of our approach to Chinese Studies is how, in an age of prosperity for China and concomitantly Chinese Studies, diversity of approach and of understanding of 'things Chinese' can be fostered and protected. The present essay highlights issues related to 'Chinese language literacy' in the context of China's state-sponsored Confucius Institutes, Chinese language orthography and non-standard forms of Chinese, be they written or spoken. The official reason given for the propagation of Confucius Institutes is that they promote interest in and appreciation for Chinese culture and language abroad; proliferation of Confucius Institutes is often mentioned against the backdrop of a larger effort to increase China's cultural 'soft power' worldwide. The logic of the foundation of Confucius Institutes is that encouraging non-Chinese to understand more about China and Chinese will lead them to develop more positive attitudes towards China itself. The difference between the new Confucius Institutes and other state-backed institutions such as the Goethe Institute and the Alliance Française is that Confucius Institutes are founded within pre-existing international educational institutions; consequently there is a widely-held suspicion that these institutes are aimed less at fostering interest in China and Chinese culture itself, and more at ensuring that such interest is guided along lines approved of by the Chinese party-state. The Chinese Character-no simple matter In early March 2009, delegates to the National People's Political Consultative Congress in Beijing argued over whether the state should move to reintroduce traditional-style Chinese characters. The Chinese written language was standardised and its orthography simplified during the 1950s and 60s as part of the socialist transformation of China under the Communist Party.

Oct. 5, 2022, 6:40 p.m.
Explainer: What is an 'everything app' and why does Elon Musk want to make one?
Explainer: What is an 'everything app' and why does Elon Musk want to make one?
['app', 'Musk', 'Super', 'company', 'Twitter']

Why is Elon Musk suddenly thinking about creating an "everything app," and what does that even mean?

Explainer: What is an 'everything app' and why does Elon Musk want to make one?

Oct 5 - Why is Elon Musk suddenly thinking about creating an "Everything app," and what does that even mean? Musk is now willing to proceed with his original plan to buy the social media company for $44 billion and late on Tuesday he tweeted: "Buying Twitter is an accelerant to creating X, the everything app." The concept of an everything app, often referred to as a "Super app," is massively popular in Asia and tech companies across the world have tried to replicate it. WHAT IS A SUPER APP? A super app, or what Musk refers to as an "Everything app," has been described as the Swiss army knife of mobile apps, offering a suite of services for users such as messaging, social networking, peer-to-peer payments and e-commerce shopping. WHAT ARE SOME EXAMPLES OF SUPER APPS? Chinese super app WeChat has more than 1 billion monthly users, according to one estimate, and is a ubiquitous part of daily life in China. Grab, a leading super app across Southeast Asia, offers food delivery, ride-hailing, on-demand package delivery and financial services and investing. WHY DOES MUSK WANT TO MAKE A SUPER APP? During a question-and-answer session with Twitter employees in June, Musk noted there is no equivalent to a super app like WeChat outside of Asia.

Oct. 5, 2022, 6:38 p.m.
'China is learning very quickly': Why the historic US-Pacific partnership hasn't dashed Beijing's hopes
'China is learning very quickly': Why the historic US-Pacific partnership hasn't dashed Beijing's hopes
['Pacific', 'Island', 'China', 'Solomon', 'Minister']

A week after the US and the Pacific signed a historic joint-partnership declaration, Cook Islands Prime Minister Mark Brown says China had a "different approach to engaging with the Pacific" to the US, while an expert says Beijing will not be deterred from pu…

'China is learning very quickly': Why the historic US-Pacific partnership hasn't dashed Beijing's hopes

Cook Islands Prime Minister Mark Brown says respect for their sovereignty was likely among the reasons why Pacific leaders accepted an offer of partnership from the US, after earlier shelving China's. "For many Pacific countries emerging from COVID, fighting climate change and with increased debt, we would be looking for support from all corners," Mr Brown told the ABC's Pacific Beat program. Last week, Cook Islands was among the 14 Pacific Island states that endorsed the historic joint declaration with the US, in an attempt by Washington to counter China's increasing influence in the region. Mr Manele said Solomon Islands welcomed "The US re-engagement with the Pacific" but he also reiterated the nation's support for China. Not a clear-cut win for the US, says expert Tarcisius Kabutaulaka - an associate professor at the Center for Pacific Islands Studies at the University of Hawaii - said he believed the Pacific nations had been in discussions with the US long before last week's leaders' summit in Washington. "That's different to China, who came to the talks trying to push its development and security pact with Pacific Island countries without that background work."I would assume that some of that had been taking place not only when the leaders were in New York for the UN General Assembly, but perhaps even before that. "A lot of China's past engagements have been bilateral and, recently, we've seen China ramping up its multilateral engagements through the Pacific Island foreign ministers' meeting and the Pacific Islands Forum.

Oct. 5, 2022, 6:28 p.m.
U.S. Acknowledges Child Labour in Electric Vehicle Supply Chain
U.S. Acknowledges Child Labour in Electric Vehicle Supply Chain
['cobalt', 'materials', 'clean', 'energy', 'labour']

The federal government has, for the first time, included crucial raw materials needed for the clean energy transition under a... The post U.S. Acknowledges Child Labour in Electric Vehicle Supply Chain appeared first on Gizmodo Australia.   Related Stories …

U.S. Acknowledges Child Labour in Electric Vehicle Supply Chain

The federal government has, for the first time, included crucial raw materials needed for the clean energy transition under a list of goods that have child or forced labour in their supply chains. The inclusion of these materials in the report is meant to "[draw] attention to critical supply chains in clean energy," Thea Mei Lee, the Deputy Undersecretary for International Affairs, said in a foreword to the report. The market for cobalt, in particular, is already growing astronomically as the electric vehicle market expands: demand for cobalt increased by 22% in 2021, while some estimates say it could grow 30% by 2025. The labour practices surrounding both these materials have serious issues. Last year, the U.S. banned the import of polysilicon from certain companies in China in order to crack down on the horrific labour practices of that supply chain. The import of products containing cobalt from the DRC remains unregulated - and experts told E&E News in March that they don't expect to see a similar crackdown on cobalt products. The Biden administration has been working to boost battery production to jumpstart the clean energy revolution, while simultaneously staying mostly silent on how it plans to deal with the problematic labour and environmental practices of mining for materials used in these batteries.

Oct. 5, 2022, 6:15 p.m.
Michigan Announces $715 Million Contract With Chinese Communist Party-Affiliated Company
Michigan Announces $715 Million Contract With Chinese Communist Party-Affiliated Company
['Gotion', 'Chinese', 'Michigan', 'battery', 'company']

A Michigan government board approved $715 million in grants and a tax exemption for a battery manufacturer with deep ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

Michigan Announces $715 Million Contract With Chinese Communist Party-Affiliated Company

A Michigan government board approved on Wednesday $715 million in grants and a tax exemption for a battery manufacturer with deep ties to the Chinese Communist Party. Gotion is headed up by Zhen Li, a member of the Chinese Communist Party who served three terms on a party committee. The Michigan Strategic Fund Board's grant will reportedly save Gotion, Inc., $540 million over a 30-year period. The Michigan state legislature approved $1 billion in new spending on Sept. 28, $846 million of which goes to the fund that Gotion will be paid out of. "We are thrilled to congratulate the Gotion team on choosing Michigan as their American home for opportunity! Team Michigan continues to out-hustle and out-compete to ensure every global company considering their future expansion opportunities can see their future here in our state, just like Gotion does," Quentin L. Messer, Jr., chairman of the MSF Board, said in a statement. Li is the second-largest shareholder of Gotion, behind only Volkswagen, according to Electrive, and is the "De facto controller" of the company. Chinese investors control 352,140 acres of American farmland, roughly one percent of all foreign investment.

Oct. 5, 2022, 5:13 p.m.
Cheap US gas is a thing of the past for energy-starved Europe as inflation pushes up costs, Texas energy boss says
Cheap US gas is a thing of the past for energy-starved Europe as inflation pushes up costs, Texas energy boss says
['gas', 'LNG', 'Europe', 'energy', 'billion']

Europe should invest in US gas projects if it wants to control its access to the resource, the LNG veteran said, as competition with China steps up.

Cheap US gas is a thing of the past for energy-starved Europe as inflation pushes up costs, Texas energy boss says

Europe can no longer rely on cheap natural gas imports from the US as it grapples with an energy crisis, the cofounder of a Texas-based LNG company has reportedly warned. "Because of that, dreaming about the days when you could get gas on the water for $4-$5 is something of the past," Souki told the Energy Intelligence Forum on Tuesday, Energy Intelligence reported. Europe is facing a major energy crunch this winter and is scrambling to replace the natural gas volumes lost after Russia halted gas flows via Nord Stream 1. The US has stepped up to provide liquefied natural gas to Europe to help it meet its winter gas storage targets, and it became the world's largest LNG exporter during the first half of 2022, according to the EIA. US shipments of gas made up more than 70% of Europe's imports in the year to September. The head of the International Energy Agency, has warned that gas supplies will be squeezed next year as China emerges from COVID-zero curbs and steps up its competition for available gas. Europe is already paying two to three times the price for natural gas that Asian buyers are putting up, according to Greece's prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis. Tellurian's Souki said investment in US gas projects could be Europe's way of managing its access to supplies.

Oct. 5, 2022, 4:50 p.m.
There's an Election Misinformation Blind Spot Nobody's Talking About - CNET
There's an Election Misinformation Blind Spot Nobody's Talking About - CNET
['misinformation', 'media', 'Social', 'Chinese', 'group']

Social platforms are working to curb misinformation, but still let slip through false conspiracy theories in other languages like Chinese, Spanish or Vietnamese.

There's an Election Misinformation Blind Spot Nobody's Talking About - CNET

As much as social media companies have worked to curb the spread of disinformation and misinformation, content in different languages remains a critical blind spot. The throughline for much Spanish, Vietnamese and Chinese misinformation found on social media is communism. First-generation Chinese Americans and immigrants from China more frequently use WeChat, a Tencent-owned social media platform for messaging and payments, according to misinformation researchers. While the social media companies say they're curbing misinformation on their respective platforms, there are efforts in Latino, Vietnamese American and Chinese American communities to fight for the truth directly. "There's a problem with Spanish misinformation on social media, and we noticed it mostly from just even being involved in our communities," said Rep. Ruben Gallego, a Democrat from Arizona and a member of the caucus. The caucus wants to see social media companies change their policies, put more investments into flagging false info and have culturally competent people to explain how misinformation affects Latino communities. Voto Latino found that providing factual information to Latino communities before they see misinformation on social media made it more likely they wouldn't share the false info.

Oct. 5, 2022, 4:32 p.m.
China's reliance on Russian oil has soared with more than 1 in 5 barrels of imported crude now coming from Moscow
China's reliance on Russian oil has soared with more than 1 in 5 barrels of imported crude now coming from Moscow
['indicates', 'options', 'navigation', 'next', 'previous']

Chinese imports of Russian crude oil grew in the second quarter of 2022, despite overall imports falling according to the EIA.

China's reliance on Russian oil has soared with more than 1 in 5 barrels of imported crude now coming from Moscow

Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. It indicates a way to close an interaction, or dismiss a notification. Home It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options. NEWS It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options.

Oct. 5, 2022, 4:12 p.m.
Authorities: CEO of Election Software Company Sent American Poll Workers' Data to China
Authorities: CEO of Election Software Company Sent American Poll Workers' Data to China
['election', 'data', 'company', 'Konnech', 'Thompson']

Just one day after the New York Times attempted to downplay suspicions around the election software company Konnech, the company's CEO, Eugene Yu, has been taken into custody under suspicion of sending data on American poll workers to Communist China.

Authorities: CEO of Election Software Company Sent American Poll Workers' Data to China

Just one day after the New York Times attempted to downplay suspicions around the election software company Konnech, the company's CEO, Eugene Yu, has been taken into custody under suspicion of sending data on American poll workers to Communist China. On October 3, the New York Times published an article by reporter Stuart Thompson titled "How a Tiny Elections Company Became a Conspiracy Theory Target," in which he claimed that "Election deniers" were targeting Konnech, a Michigan election software firm with just 21 U.S. employees, and had developed a theory with "Threadbare evidence" that the company had tied to the Chinese Communist Party and had given the Chinese government backdoor access to the personal data of around two million poll workers in the United States. Could adults stop using the Democrat propaganda term "Election denial" to describe people with legitimate challenges to election administration? It's so puerile. On October 4, just one day later, the NYT published another article from Thompson titled "Election Software Executive Arrested on Suspicion of Theft," in which he reported that Eugene Yu, the CEO of Konnech, had been arrested under suspicion of theft after U.S. user data was found stored in China - exactly what the "Election deniers" that Thompson had derided claimed. In a statement, a spokesperson for Konnech said that the company was attempting to learn the details "Of what we believe to be Mr. Yu's wrongful detention," and that it stood by recent statements it made in a lawsuit defending its handling of user data. "Any L. A. County poll worker data that Konnech may have possessed was provided to it by L. A. County and therefore could not have been 'stolen' as suggested," the spokesman said. In a statement, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said that it had cause to believe that the personal information on election workers was "Criminally mishandled" and was seeking to extradite Yu from Michigan to Los Angeles.

Oct. 5, 2022, 4:10 p.m.
Superior U.S. Forces Could Break China's Blockade of Taiwan: Navy Commander
Superior U.S. Forces Could Break China's Blockade of Taiwan: Navy Commander
['Taiwan', 'blockade', 'China', 'U.S.', 'military']

An all-out invasion of the island isn't the only scenario troubling defense planners in Taipei and Washington.

Superior U.S. Forces Could Break China's Blockade of Taiwan: Navy Commander

The U.S. military could overcome a blockade of Taiwan by China if Beijing sought to gain control of the island by isolating it from outside support, the commander of American naval forces in the Pacific recently said. President Xi Jinping has overseen the rapid modernization of China's military under his watch in order to develop the capabilities to take Taiwan by force if necessary and deny intervention by the United States and its allies in the process. China's intense war games around Taiwan in August included the drawing of half a dozen "Closure zones" near its major ports, into which some 11 ballistic missiles were fired. Chiu Kuo-cheng, Taiwan's defense minister, said Wednesday that China had "Taken the initiative" and would most likely follow a future blockade with an all-out attack. Washington's response to Beijing's drills around Taiwan was purposefully cautious. Taiwan warns of own "Red line" as China's military edges ever closer. China won't have element of surprise in Taiwan invasion-ex-CIA analyst.

Oct. 5, 2022, 4:05 p.m.
EV battery makers Gotion, ONE plan new Michigan plants
EV battery makers Gotion, ONE plan new Michigan plants
['battery', 'material', 'company', 'Gotion', 'Energy']

Chinese battery company Gotion High Tech (002074.SZ) and Michigan-based startup Our Next Energy (ONE) will open separate, new electric-vehicle battery plants worth a combined $4 billion…

EV battery makers Gotion, ONE plan new Michigan plants

WASHINGTON/DETROIT, Oct 5 - Chinese battery company Gotion High Tech and Michigan-based startup Our Next Energy will open separate, new electric-vehicle battery plants worth a combined $4 billion in Michigan, Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced on Wednesday. Michigan will provide about $715 million in financial incentives for the Gotion facility and $237 million for the ONE facility. Gotion, a publicly traded company in China also known as Guoxuan High Tech Company, is partly owned by German automaker Volkswagen AG. German automaker BMW is an investor in ONE. Legislation passed by U.S. Congress in August imposes requirements on a $7,500 EV tax credit designed to spur North American production of vehicles and battery components. Automakers are racing to in-source more battery and component production. New EV tax credit restrictions on battery and mineral sourcing and price and income caps take effect on Jan. 1. Chuck Thelen, vice president of Gotion Global, said in a statement the company is "Dedicated to bringing world class lithium battery production to North America and delivering high-quality products to our customers in a timely fashion." Massachusetts startup 6K Energy is partnering with ONE to integrate material refining into the Michigan complex.

Oct. 5, 2022, 4:04 p.m.
World Agricultural Center Opens in Harbin, China
World Agricultural Center Opens in Harbin, China
['Agricultural', 'World', 'talent', 'International', 'research']

This is reported by GAIN. HARBIN, China, Oct. 5, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The World Agricultural Center (the "WAC"), a new global hub for agricultural research, has opened its doors in Harbin, the capital city of China's northeastern province Heilongjiang. The op…

World Agricultural Center Opens in Harbin, China

PRNewswire/ - The World Agricultural Center, a new global hub for agricultural research, has opened its doors in Harbin. The World Agricultural Center is the world's tallest building dedicated to agricultural research. Global Headquarters of DBN officially settled in the "World Agricultural Center", and introduced a number of international institutions such as the International Black Soil Research Institute of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the International Agricultural Economic Research Center, and the International Agricultural Think Tank, and will be built as the permanent site of the annual World Agricultural Economic Forum here. Agricultural field will work together to build the world's agricultural science and technology innovation highland, and promote world agriculture to China. Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences and DBN recently held a global introduction conference for high-end agricultural talents. Liu Di., Dean of Heilongjiang Academy of Agriculture Science, and Zhang Lizhong, Vice Chairman of DBN Group, signed an agreement and jointly issued an announcement regarding the introduction of high-end agricultural talent in China. About 80 international, professional, and high-level agricultural high-end scientific research talents are expected to be introduced to the world at five levels, aiming to benchmark domestically developed regions.

Oct. 5, 2022, 3:50 p.m.
Elon Musk says Twitter purchase 'accelerant' to creating X, 'the everything app' - Fox Business
Elon Musk says Twitter purchase 'accelerant' to creating X, 'the everything app' - Fox Business
['Twitter', 'Musk', 'billion', 'app', 'year']

Elon Musk says Twitter purchase 'accelerant' to creating X, 'the everything app'  Fox Business Media worries as Elon Musk closes deal to buy Twitter: 'Be afraid, be actually afraid'  Fox News Pinterest and Snap could take market sh…

Elon Musk says Twitter purchase 'accelerant' to creating X, 'the everything app' - Fox Business

Billionaire Elon Musk revealed Tuesday that his decision to buy Twitter for $44 billion is ultimately "An accelerant to creating X, the everything app." "Twitter probably accelerates X by 3 to 5 years, but I could be wrong," he replied to a user who said it would've been easier to start X from scratch. TWITTER SAYS IT PLANS TO CLOSE DEAL WITH ELON MUSK. Musk's latest tweets come after the CEO of Tesla said during electric vehicle's annual meeting in August that he had a "Grander vision" for what he thought X. com or X corporation could have been. "It's a pretty, pretty grand vision," Musk said. "I don't have to have Twitter for that but it would, like I said, it's probably at least a three-year accelerant and I think it's something that will be very useful to the world." A few days after the meeting, Musk floated the possibility of making X. com Twitter's competitor if the deal didn't go through. At a town hall with Twitter employees in June, Musk said he wants Twitter to reach one billion users and that he planned to replicate WeChat's model, noting that people in China "Basically live" on the platform.

Oct. 5, 2022, 3:46 p.m.
Ties in focus as Pakistan army chief meets US officials
Ties in focus as Pakistan army chief meets US officials
['Pakistan', 'relationship', 'country', 'China', 'military']

Analysts say General Qamar Javed Bajwa is in Washington to ensure relations remain functional.

Ties in focus as Pakistan army chief meets US officials

During the previous decade, Pakistan steadily moved towards its main regional ally China for its economic and defence needs, which resulted in the gradual cooling-off in its relationship with the US. After the fall of Kabul to the Taliban in August last year, the relationship fractured even more. The Pakistani side felt that the US had left neighbouring Afghanistan without an exit strategy whereas the US expressed frustration that Pakistan did not play a role in controlling the Taliban. Last month, both Sharif and Foreign Minister Bilawal Bhutto Zardari met US Secretary of State Antony Blinken during their visit to the US. The top US diplomat last week defended a recently approved $450m F-16 deal after criticism from Pakistan's archrival, India. "It is perhaps a kind of assurance to the Americans by the army chief that whatever we agree, Pakistan will continue with [that] policy," Lahore-based political analyst Hassan Askari Rizvi told Al Jazeera. "In return, the US is providing some aid to Pakistan to mitigate the damage and destruction unleashed by monsoon floods as well as use its influence on the International Monetary Fund for the bailout package and help the country come off the FATF list," Basit told Al Jazeera, referring to the Financial Action Task Force, an intergovernmental body that keeps Pakistan on a watchlist of countries that do not meet the organisation's criteria to restrict the funding of terrorist groups. While rebuilding its relationship with Washington, Pakistan will also have to maintain a balancing act with China, which is at loggerheads with the US over a number of issues. "Improving ties with Pakistan is meant to counterbalance China as well as give a signal to India for snubbing the US and the West over the Ukraine conflict and continuing oil imports from Russia," he said.

Oct. 5, 2022, 3:28 p.m.
A software CEO was arrested on suspicion of storing poll worker data in China
A software CEO was arrested on suspicion of storing poll worker data in China
['Konnech', 'Vote', 'company', 'True', 'work']

The Los Angeles County District Attorney accused the CEO of a small company that makes software for election workers of illegally storing data on servers in China. The company denies the allegation.

A software CEO was arrested on suspicion of storing poll worker data in China

Authorities arrest election software CEO on suspicion of data theft The Los Angeles County District Attorney accused the CEO of a small company that makes software for election workers of illegally storing data on servers in China. District Attorney George Gascón said at a news conference that the contract with the county required the company, Konnech, to securely maintain election worker information on servers in the United States. Konnech is located in Michigan, and Gascón said his office had cooperated with local law enforcement to make the arrest. "Any L. A. County poll worker data that Konnech may have possessed was provided to it by L. A. County, and therefore could not have been 'stolen' as suggested," said the spokesperson, Jon Goldberg. Last month, Konnech claimed Yu and the company were the target of a "Smear campaign" led by "Conspiracy theorists," who accused Konnech of holding data in China. The company added a "2022 Election Mis-information Advisory" to their website, which stated, "Konnech has never stored customer data on servers in China." Goldberg reiterated that claim in comments to NPR and other news outlets. In the lawsuit, Konnech again contended that the company "Does not, and has never, stored any actual customer or poll worker data on any server in China," and convinced a federal judge to issue a temporary restraining order against True the Vote.

Oct. 5, 2022, 3:10 p.m.
Election Software CEO Arrested Over Suspected Poll Worker Data Theft
Election Software CEO Arrested Over Suspected Poll Worker Data Theft
['Konnech', 'election', 'County', 'data', 'company']

The founder and CEO of Konnech, a company at the center of many 2020 election denier conspiracy theories, was arrested on Tuesday under suspicion of data theft. Specifically, Eugene Yu is accused of storing Los Angeles County poll worker information on server…

Election Software CEO Arrested Over Suspected Poll Worker Data Theft

The founder and CEO of Konnech, a company at the center of many 2020 election denier conspiracy theories, was arrested on Tuesday under suspicion of data theft. Konnech is a small company that distributes PollChief, an election worker management software, to multiple municipalities around the U.S., including Los Angeles. Using threadbare evidence, or none at all, the group suggested that a small American election software company, Konnech, had secret ties to the Chinese Communist Party and had given the Chinese government backdoor access to personal data about two million poll workers in the United States, according to online accounts from several people at the conference. In a statement to The Washington Post, the company wrote, "We are continuing to ascertain the details of what we believe to be Mr. Yu's wrongful detention by LA County authorities." The company further said that "Any LA County poll worker data that Konnech may have possessed was provided to it by LA County, and therefore could not have been 'stolen' as suggested." Worth noting: Regardless of whether or not some of Konnech's data was stored on servers in China, LA County said that would've had no bearing on election results or vote counts. "This investigation is concerned solely with the personal identifying information of election workers. In this case, the alleged conduct had no impact on the tabulation of votes and did not alter election results," the county's news statement said. "But security in all aspects of any election is essential so that we all have full faith in the integrity of the election process."

Oct. 5, 2022, 3:09 p.m.
China, equities weigh as EM sees another month of outflows - IIF
China, equities weigh as EM sees another month of outflows - IIF
['billion', 'month', 'market', 'last', 'Emerging']

Emerging market portfolios saw another month of foreign outflows in September, the seventh of the last eight, as non-residents pulled money out of EM stocks and away from China, data from the Institute of International Finance showed on Wednesday.

China, equities weigh as EM sees another month of outflows - IIF

Oct 5 - Emerging market portfolios saw another month of foreign outflows in September, the seventh of the last eight, as non-residents pulled money out of EM stocks and away from China, data from the Institute of International Finance showed on Wednesday. China debt markets lost $1.4 billion in September for a total of $98.2 billion pulled out of the asset class over eight months as investors shy away from a slowing economy. Chinese stock portfolios shed $0.7 billion last month. The year-to-date outflow stands at $2.2 billion. EM stock portfolios outside China also posted outflows, with $8.2 billion exiting the asset class last month, while ex-China debt saw inflows of $7.5 billion to stem some of the bleeding. On balance, foreigners pulled $2.9 billion from emerging market portfolios last month, for a year-to-date figure of $12.7 billion in outflows. IIF data broken down by region showed an inflow of $2.4 billion to Latin America last month and a $0.3 billion flow to EM Europe.

Oct. 5, 2022, 3:03 p.m.
What Elon Musk might do with Twitter if deal to buy it goes ahead
What Elon Musk might do with Twitter if deal to buy it goes ahead
['Twitter', 'Musk', 'company', 'platform', 'concerns']

‘Free speech absolutist’ could reinstate Donald Trump and press ahead with ‘everything app’ XElon Musk has performed a U-turn on his decision earlier this year to walk away from a $44bn (£38.6bn) acquisition of Twitter and is back to pondering his plans for t…

What Elon Musk might do with Twitter if deal to buy it goes ahead

Elon Musk has performed a U-turn on his decision earlier this year to walk away from a $44bn acquisition of Twitter and is back to pondering his plans for the social media platform. The same cache showed Mathias Döpfner, chief executive of the media group Alex Springer, which includes Politico, urging Musk to make Twitter "Censorship free" and create a "Marketplace for algorithms" so that "If you're a snowflake and don't want content that offends you, pick another algorithm". Launching the 'everything app' Musk tweeted to his more than 100 million followers on Tuesday that buying Twitter was "An accelerant to creating X, the everything app". X, by the way, is the name for the corporate vehicles that Musk is using to buy Twitter. In a meeting with Twitter staff in June, Musk said the platform should be more like the Chinese WeChat, an app that enables instant messaging, social media and mobile payment. Raising revenue Shortly after agreeing to buy the business this year, Musk had indicated he wanted to quintuple Twitter's annual revenue to $26.4bn by 2028, according to the New York Times. Musk has fallen out with Parag Agrawal, the Twitter CEO, and according to reports in May has lined himself up as temporary chief executive.

Oct. 5, 2022, 2:54 p.m.
What's Happened to China's Economy?
What's Happened to China's Economy?
['policy', 'government', 'local', 'China', 'economic']

Since Deng Xiaoping launched China's economic reform in 1978, policymakers have usually managed to strike a dynamic balance between local-government accountability and innovation. Today, however, centralization is encouraging local officials to keep their hea…

What's Happened to China's Economy?

Local-level innovation is not incompatible with the implementation of the national COVID-19 policy framework; on the contrary, failure to tailor policies to local conditions can weaken their impact. Most local governments have not adopted innovative approaches to implementing pandemic-related policies, and in many cases they have implemented such policies much more aggressively than required. Since April, after recognizing the huge economic cost imposed by its pandemic-control policy, the central government has introduced a series of policies aimed at easing the financial constraints on micro, small, and medium-size enterprises that have been hurt by COVID-19-containment measures, and it has worked to restore supply in specific sectors, including automobiles, electronics, and transportation. Since Deng Xiaoping launched his "Reform and opening-up" agenda in 1978, China has usually managed to strike a dynamic balance between local-government accountability and local policy innovation, thereby maximizing the benefits and minimizing the costs of both. Local governments have long served as a major source of policy innovation in China. While the central government drew up the main policy roadmap, local governments were encouraged and inspired to pursue policy innovation, experimentation, and adaptation. Because local governments were empowered to adapt policies and programs to their context, policy shocks became less likely.

Oct. 5, 2022, 2:54 p.m.
Fears grow over oil price as Opec+ agrees to cut output
Fears grow over oil price as Opec+ agrees to cut output
['oil', 'price', 'Opec', 'nations', 'barrel']

Cartel curbs production by 2m barrels a day despite strong US pressureThe Opec oil cartel and its allies have agreed to a significant cut in oil production targets despite significant pressure from the US.The Opec+ group of oil-producing nations signed up to …

Fears grow over oil price as Opec+ agrees to cut output

The Opec oil cartel and its allies have agreed to a bigger than expected cut in oil production targets despite significant pressure from the US. The Opec+ group of oil-producing nations signed up to a cut in output of 2m barrels a day, surpassing predictions earlier in the week of cuts of 1m to 1.5m barrels, squeezing supplies in a tight market. Founded in 1960, the cartel of the world's biggest oil producers emerged as a political and economic force with the 1973-74 US oil embargo, which caused oil prices to spike. In response to the 2014-16 oil price slump, Opec partnered with Russia in December 2016 to agree a cut in production of 1.8m barrels a day. Between them these nations supply 55 percent of oil production and hold 90 percent of the planet's oil reserves. Although oil prices have fallen from the highs of about $130 a barrel seen in the summer, when Russia's invasion of Ukraine tightened supplies, motorists in the UK and the US have still experienced high prices at the pump, exacerbating the cost of living crisis. The invasion of Ukraine has upended world oil markets, with western nations shunning Russian oil and exporters in Russia instead increasingly shipping to India and China. If oil prices rise sharply, the White House could opt to release additional barrels from the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve, or curb domestic exports of refined products, to calm prices.

Oct. 5, 2022, 2:48 p.m.
A 'confident' India attempts to strike a difficult balance with both US and China
A 'confident' India attempts to strike a difficult balance with both US and China
['India', 'China', 'Jaishankar', 'Quad', 'BRICS']

India’s foreign minister, Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, spent 11 days in US working the UN General Assembly and Washington, but little time with Chinese counterparts.

A 'confident' India attempts to strike a difficult balance with both US and China

A confident India wasn't so sure about engaging its biggest neighbour, China. After regarding the US with suspicion for decades, India has felt compelled to align more closely with Washington and its allies as China's military might and economic influence have grown. India has also pursued better ties with Asean nations under its Act East Policy, a move that makes Beijing uncomfortable since it believes this could eventually lead India to play an outsize role in the South China Sea. If Jaishankar's 11 days of diplomacy reveal anything, it is that India is trying to strike a balance, strengthening its US ties to counter China while striving to rebuild its relationship with its powerful and hostile neighbour. Most countries in the Global South have chosen not to take sides as the US-China geopolitical competition intensifies, but India - a member of both BRICS, which includes China, and the Quad, a US-led security bloc aimed at countering China - finds itself in a tricky situation. B. R. Deepak, a sinologist at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, has said that border incidents in 2017 and 2020 with China likely "Pushed India to rethink its involvement in the Quad" and "Played a decisive role in India's move to incorporate the Quad and the Indo-Pacific strategy into its military and foreign policy". "While India had a twinge of envy for China's rise, it saw opportunities for win-win cooperation. Yet over the past two decades, India has become increasingly wary of the dangers of widening economic, military and technological asymmetries between the two countries," he has written.

Oct. 5, 2022, 2:35 p.m.
"Chef Peter Chang announces an October 8 opening for Chang Chang in Dupont Circle"
"Chef Peter Chang announces an October 8 opening for Chang Chang in Dupont Circle"
['Chang', 'menu', 'restaurant', 'chef', 'Peter']

1200 19th Street, NW From a press release: "Chef Peter Chang and his daughter Lydia Chang announce an October 8 debut for Chang Chang, their dual concept contemporary Chinese restaurant in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of downtown Washington, D.C. The two-in…

"Chef Peter Chang announces an October 8 opening for Chang Chang in Dupont Circle"

Chang Out features a carryout and delivery menu with favorite dishes from Peter Chang's popular locations from Virginia Beach to Connecticut. Menu items will include Peter Chang favorites like pan-fried dumplings, mapo tofu, eggplant with spicy garlic sauce, bamboo fish, and sweet and sour spare ribs. Chang In, the full service side of Chang Chang, offers an original take on seasonal modern Chinese cooking. Working with Peter Chang is Simon Lam, a Cantonese-American chef and Peter Chang protegee who cooked previously at Chang's Baltimore restaurant NiHao, and whose resume includes Chef José Andrés's China Chilcano. "It has been a true pleasure to build the menu for Chang Chang," said Peter Chang through his daughter Lydia. "All of my restaurants have been collaborations, working with my wife Lisa, and our great cooks and hosts, but at Chang Chang we are really gathering a strong team of specialists. In addition to working with exciting talents like Chef Simon and Pichet Ong, a family friend and inspiring chef, we're bringing so many young cooks into the kitchen who are excited to learn about and spread the flavors of modern Chinese cuisine." "The Changs worked with District firm Nahra Design Group to design the look of the 5,000-square foot space which will include seating for 180 along with a bar and seasonal patio. Those familiar with Chang's other restaurants will notice a more elegant, feminine design at Chang Chang, with white textured walls and intricate herringbone floors framing intimate arched-ceiling booths. At the front of the restaurant a group dining area offers large tables with central lazy susans near the 12-seat bar."

Oct. 5, 2022, 2:32 p.m.
Taiwan says it won't rely on others for defense
Taiwan says it won't rely on others for defense
['Taiwan', 'U.S.', 'Tsai', 'military', 'Chinese']

Taiwan won't rely on others for its defense, President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday, while welcoming a U.S. commitment to the democratically governed island's security amid what she called Chinese encroachment on its sovereignty.

Taiwan says it won't rely on others for defense

WASHINGTON, Oct 5 - Taiwan won't rely on others for its defense, President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday, while welcoming a U.S. commitment to the democratically governed island's security amid what she called Chinese encroachment on its sovereignty. Tsai's remarks, pre-recorded and delivered to a U.S. audience at a forum in Washington, come after U.S. President Joe Biden pledged in September to defend Taiwan in the event of any "Unprecedented attack" by China. In her address to the Washington-based Global Taiwan Institute think tank, Tsai thanked the Biden administration and the U.S. Congress for "Upholding the U.S. commitment to Taiwan's security", and for recent U.S. military arms sales. "That is why I want to reiterate that Taiwan is fully committed to protecting our security and maintaining our democratic way of life. We're also working to adapt our defense strategy to the changing threats we face." Though the White House has said Biden's pledge did not signify a change in U.S. policy, critics argue he may have undercut - intentionally or not - a U.S. stance of not taking a position on Taiwan's independence. China, which views Taiwan as its own territory, mounted large-scale military drills to display its anger over an August visit there by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Chinese military activities have continued since then, though at a much reduced level, and Chinese military aircraft are routinely crossing the median line in the Taiwan Strait, which had for years acted as an unofficial barrier between the two sides.

Oct. 5, 2022, 2:30 p.m.
'Turning Red's' Domee Shi Draws From Her Past
'Turning Red's' Domee Shi Draws From Her Past
['Shi', 'Pixar', 'film', 'turn', 'first']

“A Chinese Canadian tween undergoes magical puberty and turns into a giant red panda.” As far as elevator pitches go, it’s not exactly “‘Jaws’ in space” or “snakes on a plane.” But that highly specific logline is the one that Domee Shi used to persuade Pixar …

'Turning Red's' Domee Shi Draws From Her Past

As far as elevator pitches go, it's not exactly "'Jaws' in space" or "Snakes on a plane." But that highly specific logline is the one that Domee Shi used to persuade Pixar to greenlight her feature directorial debut, some half a decade ago when the then-20-something was a budding storyboard artist on the studio's Emeryville campus. Shi was particularly heartened by the responses the film has drawn from women and Asian communities, in particular, although there were a few loud voices on the internet who found some of its themes too mature for a Pixar audience. Born in Chongquing, China, and raised mostly in Toronto, Shi grew up "Watching just as much anime and Miyazaki as I did Disney and Pixar," drawing and writing stories from a young age. Shi admits to some complicated feelings about the release. Shi does hasten to add that, notwithstanding the studio's first episodic series, "Win or Lose," premiering next year, Pixar is still very much in the business of theatrical features. So how did Shi navigate Pixar's famously intense creative process, which yielded no fewer than eight different provisional versions of "Turning Red," as a first-timer? She credits a closeknit creative team, especially production designer Rona Liu, for helping her synthesize influences ranging from "Sailor Moon" and "Ranma ½" to Edgar Wright films to forge "Turning Red's" distinctive aesthetic and vibe. Quickly her role at the studio may have changed, Shi is still an animator first and foremost, and she's already back in development on her directorial follow-up.

Oct. 5, 2022, 2:03 p.m.
CEO Arrested For Allegedly Storing Personal Information Of Hundreds Of Los Angeles Election Workers In China
CEO Arrested For Allegedly Storing Personal Information Of Hundreds Of Los Angeles Election Workers In China
['information', 'Konnech', 'store', 'Yu', 'Los']

Konnech CEO Eugene Yu was arrested Tuesday in Michigan after LA County prosecutors alleged he stored millions of election workers‘ personal data in China.

CEO Arrested For Allegedly Storing Personal Information Of Hundreds Of Los Angeles Election Workers In China

Konnech CEO Eugene Yu, 51, was arrested Tuesday in Michigan after Los Angeles County prosecutors alleged he stored the personal information of hundreds of county election workers on servers in China. The county awarded Yu's firm, Konnech, a contract in 2020 to store information pertaining to the employee payroll and scheduling data on the guarantee that he would store all information within the U.S., according to a statement shared by LA County. Michigan is expected to extradite him to Los Angeles in the coming days, according to the Los Angeles Times. "Konnech allegedly violated its contract by storing critical information that the workers provided on servers in China," Los Angeles district attorney George Gascon said, the LA Times continued. "We intend to hold all those responsible for this breach accountable." While it did not appear that any of the information was sold, Gascon noted, any data stored in China can be provided to Chinese intelligence and security agencies at their demand. True The Vote reportedly stated that members of the not-for-profit were able to download the personal information of 1.8 million poll workers, held on Konnech servers in China, information that was subsequently handed to the FBI, according to The Post Millennial. Konnech did not immediately return The Daily Caller's request for comment or statement on Yu's arrest.

Oct. 5, 2022, 1:42 p.m.
'Conspiracy theory' criticized by NY Times confirmed one day later: CEO of election-software company arrested for allegedly giving poll worker data to communist Chinese government
'Conspiracy theory' criticized by NY Times confirmed one day later: CEO of election-software company arrested for allegedly giving poll worker data to communist Chinese government
['Konnech', 'election', 'Vote', 'company', 'True']

On October 3, the New York Times' Stuart Thompson criticized so-called "far-right election deniers" for a "conspiracy theory" alleging that Konnech, an election software company based in East Lansing, Michigan, had "secret ties to the Chinese Communist Party …

'Conspiracy theory' criticized by NY Times confirmed one day later: CEO of election-software company arrested for allegedly giving poll worker data to communist Chinese government

On October 3, the New York Times' Stuart Thompson criticized so-called "Far-right election deniers" for a "Conspiracy theory" alleging that Konnech, an election software company based in East Lansing, Michigan, had "Secret ties to the Chinese Communist Party and had given the Chinese government backdoor access to personal data about two million poll workers in the United States." According to Gascón's office, while Konnech was required to store sensitive election-related data in the United States and only make it accessible to citizens and permanent residents, the company had stored data on servers in China. True the Vote, a Texas-based nonprofit founded in 2009 with a mandate to bolster election integrity, was sued by Konnech last month for defamation, after True the Vote claimed the company was guilty of that for which Yu has now been arrested. Konnech sells a proprietary software called PollChief, an election worker management system. The NY Times reported that, according to Konnech, the company had "No ties to the Chinese government." Konnech Inc. filed a defamation lawsuit against True the Vote on September 12, suggesting that the group's accusations of wrongdoing were damaging and would prove "Particularly problematic in light of the upcoming 2022 midterm elections, for which Konnech has contracts to provide election logistics software for voting districts across the country." Konnech and members of the media who reported on the lawsuit suggested that True the Vote leaders' intimations that Yu may have been cooperating with Chinese communists were racist and xenophobic and that the claim Yu was spearheading a "Red Chinese communist op run against the United States" was not an expression of geopolitical concern but of bigotry.

Oct. 5, 2022, 12:57 p.m.
Taiwan outlines 'major challenge' for military
Taiwan outlines 'major challenge' for military
['Taiwan', 'island', 'Beijing', 'report', 'military']

Taiwan’s military is facing recruitment shortages due to declining birthrates, the interior ministry has warned parliament Read Full Article at RT.com

Taiwan outlines 'major challenge' for military

Taiwan's military is failing to meet its recruitment targets, with the issue likely to become a "Major challenge" to its defense capabilities in the future, the interior ministry has warned. The situation in Taiwan's professional military is no bette; the report notes that in March its recruitment drive fell nearly 15% short of its target. While falling birthrates are a common problem in the region, Taiwan has the distinction of having one of the world's lowest. The document comes at a time when Taiwan is trying to beef up its army fearing a potential attack from Beijing. Taiwan has governed itself since nationalist forces led by Chiang Kai-shek fled to the island in 1949, after they lost in the civil war to the Communists. Relations between mainland China and Taiwan have deteriorated dramatically over the past year. Beijing held large-scale military drills near the island following the controversial visit of US House of Representatives Speaker, Nancy Pelosi in August.

Oct. 5, 2022, 12:54 p.m.
BYD widens its presence in Europe by selling 100,000 EVs to German rental company SIXT
BYD widens its presence in Europe by selling 100,000 EVs to German rental company SIXT
['BYD', 'EV', 'SIXT', 'Europe', 'purchase']

Mere months after announcing its expansion into several European markets, Chinese automaker Build Your Dreams (BYD) is making quick moves to get more of its EVs on streets overseas. German car rental company SIXT has just signed on to purchase around 100,000 …

BYD widens its presence in Europe by selling 100,000 EVs to German rental company SIXT

German car rental company SIXT has just signed on to purchase around 100,000 EVs from BYD that will be available to rent in Europe beginning this year. SIXT has taken notice as well, and looks to be the first car rental company in Europe to offer BYD EVs. According to a press release from SIXT, it will purchase "Around 100,000" EVs from BYD to offer as rental vehicles throughout Europe. The first stage of the agreement includes several thousand BYD EVs that will be available to customers this quarter, beginning in Germany, France, the Netherlands, and the UK. This initial purchase will consist of Atto 3 c-segment SUVs, so European customers using SIXT can expect to rent those EVs first. According to SIXT, its initial order for BYD EVs is the first phase of a six-year rollout that should total roughly 100K vehicles. We are very much looking forward to our cooperation with BYD. Although SIXT's current agreement for BYD EVs includes the EU and UK only, the companies relayed that they are already exploring potential opportunities to collaborate in different regions around the world. If they were to do so, it could make for some excellent competition, as SIXT's car rental competitors like Hertz have already signed similar purchase agreements for EVs with automakers like Tesla and most recently, GM. Check back with Electrek soon to see what BYD is up to next, it's sure to be something.

Oct. 5, 2022, 12:48 p.m.
Apple US manufacturing operations double, but likely mostly small-scale test production
Apple US manufacturing operations double, but likely mostly small-scale test production
['Apple', 'manufacture', 'product', 'Prototypes', 'production']

On paper, Apple US manufacturing operations doubled between 2020 and 2021 – but the likely reality is that the vast majority of US production is carried out on a small scale, for test purposes. The number of US manufacturing sites among Apple’s suppliers incr…

Apple US manufacturing operations double, but likely mostly small-scale test production

On paper, Apple US manufacturing operations doubled between 2020 and 2021 - but the likely reality is that the vast majority of US production is carried out on a small scale, for test purposes. The number of US manufacturing sites among Apple's suppliers increased from 25 to 48 in the course of a year, according to the company's latest supplier list. The majority of Apple products are made in China, though the company has been slowly working on diversifying into other countries. Apple has now published its latest Supplier List, and Bloomberg notes the increase in US manufacturing sites. Of Apple's more than 180 suppliers, 48 had manufacturing sites in the U.S. as of September 2021, up from 25 a year earlier, according to a supplier list released by Apple. Apple is naturally secretive about its exact processes, but there are known stages - and it's likely that two to three of them are carried out in the US. Given COVID-19 lockdowns in China, Apple may have moved more of the early test phases to the US. Prototypes. Apple makes prototypes in its own design studios, which include capabilities like computer-controlled milling of aluminum, and 3D printing.

Oct. 5, 2022, 12:28 p.m.
Apple Will Produce AirPods And Beats Headphones In India For The First Time
Apple Will Produce AirPods And Beats Headphones In India For The First Time
['China', 'Manufactured', 'Apple', 'company', 'production']

Once the US understood that China was becoming more powerful in terms of manufacturing facilities and advanced technologies, it began doing its best to make ... The post Apple Will Produce AirPods And Beats Headphones In India For The First Time appeared firs…

Apple Will Produce AirPods And Beats Headphones In India For The First Time

Now, it's the turn of the AirPods and Beats headphones. The Decision Has Roots In fact, until today, Apple orders the production of AirPods to Foxconn and Luxshare. For those who are unaware, long ago, Apple chose China as its manufacturing base. A recent analysis showed that if Apple wants to reduce its dependence on China by 10%, it will take more than eight years. AirPods and Beats Headphones Are Manufactured in Vietnam As Well By the way, Apple has already moved a huge part of AirPods and Beats production from China to Vietnam. The latest report shows that Vietnam already makes most Apple headphones. Lastly, we should recall that India has already considered Apple's second major manufacturing hub.

Oct. 5, 2022, 12:07 p.m.
USA Aims to Turn Taiwan Into Giant Weapons Depot...
USA Aims to Turn Taiwan Into Giant Weapons Depot...
['Taiwan', 'official', 'State', 'China', 'weapons']

USA Aims to Turn Taiwan Into Giant Weapons Depot... (Third column, 4th story, link) Related stories:Island Will Treat China Flights Into Airspace as 'First Strike'... Drudge Report Feed needs your support!   Become a Patron

USA Aims to Turn Taiwan Into Giant Weapons Depot...

WASHINGTON - American officials are intensifying efforts to build a giant stockpile of weapons in Taiwan after studying recent naval and air force exercises by the Chinese military around the island, according to current and former officials. The effort to transform Taiwan into a weapons depot faces challenges. Mr. Biden said last month that U.S. troops would defend Taiwan if China were to carry out an "Unprecedented attack" on the island - the fourth time he has stated that commitment and a shift from a preference for "Strategic ambiguity" on Taiwan among U.S. presidents. Recently, the Ukrainians have pummeled Russian troops with mobile American-made rocket launchers known as HIMARS. To transform Taiwan into a "Porcupine," an entity bristling with armaments that would be costly to attack, American officials have been trying to steer Taiwanese counterparts toward ordering more of those weapons and fewer systems for a conventional ground war like M1 Abrams tanks. The Biden administration announced on Sept. 2 that it had approved its sixth weapons package for Taiwan - a $1.1 billion sale that includes 60 Harpoon coastal antiship missiles. Some senior senators are trying to push through the proposed Taiwan Policy Act, which would provide $6.5 billion in security assistance to Taiwan over the next four years and mandate treating the island as if it were a "Major non-NATO ally." China has probably studied the strategic failure of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, he said, and the United States should continue to send the kinds of arms to Taiwan that will make either an amphibious invasion or an attack with long-range weapons much more difficult for China.

Oct. 5, 2022, 12:07 p.m.
Island Will Treat China Flights Into Airspace as 'First Strike'...
Island Will Treat China Flights Into Airspace as 'First Strike'...
['Taiwan', 'China', 'Chinese', 'respond', 'incursion']

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwan’s defense minister on Wednesday said the island will respond to incursions into its airspace by Chinese warplanes and drones, but gave no details on specific actions. Responding to questions from legislators, Chiu Kuo-cheng said C…

Island Will Treat China Flights Into Airspace as 'First Strike'...

TAIPEI, Taiwan - Taiwan's defense minister on Wednesday said the island will respond to incursions into its airspace by Chinese warplanes and drones, but gave no details on specific actions. China stepped up its military exercises, fired missiles into waters near Taiwan and sent warplanes across the dividing line in the Taiwan Strait in response to an August visit to the island by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the highest-ranking American official to visit Taiwan in 25 years. China denies the existence of the median line in the Taiwan Strait and challenged established norms by firing missiles over Taiwan into Japan's exclusive economic zone. Taiwan has thus far responded to Chinese incursions into its air defense identification zone by issuing warnings, scrambling jets and activating anti-air missile defenses. The growing frequency of such incursions has spurred a push in Taiwan to optimize its geographical advantages in resisting a much more powerful foe through asymmetrical warfare, such as the use of mobile weapons systems suited to repelling an invasion force. A former Japanese colony, Taiwan separated from mainland China in 1949 as Mao Zedong's Communists forced Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists to relocate across the 180-kilometer -wide Taiwan Strait. ADVERTISEMENT. Chen also said Taiwan was firm in safeguarding trade secrets and key national technologies and ensuring its top scientific talent is not poached by China.

Oct. 5, 2022, noon
Election Misinformation in English Is Bad. In Other Languages, It's Out of Control - CNET
Election Misinformation in English Is Bad. In Other Languages, It's Out of Control - CNET
['misinformation', 'media', 'Social', 'Chinese', 'group']

There are fewer guardrails in place to stop the spread of misinformation when they appear in other languages, such as Chinese, Vietnamese or Spanish.

Election Misinformation in English Is Bad. In Other Languages, It's Out of Control - CNET

As startling as DeSantis' scheme was, it doesn't match the magnitude of misinformation broadcast in different languages across social media. Chinese Americans and Vietnamese Americans - whose languages, along with Spanish, represent three of the most widely spoken non-English languages in the US - see huge amounts of foreign-language misinformation. Misinformation in English is a pressing issue causing concerns about the upcoming midterm elections and the potential damage to the institutions of democracy and responsible for numerous deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic. First-generation Chinese Americans and immigrants from China more frequently use WeChat, a Tencent-owned social media platform for messaging and payments, according to misinformation researchers. Another group at the heart of misinformation in multiple languages is a media empire backed by a religious movement. YouTube spokesperson Elana Hernandez says the company's misinformation policies are global and that YouTube applies them consistently across languages and regions. While the social media companies say they're curbing misinformation on their respective platforms, there are efforts in Latino, Vietnamese American and Chinese American communities to fight for the truth directly.

Oct. 5, 2022, 11:39 a.m.
Taiwan Warns of Own 'Red Line' As China's Military Edges Ever Closer
Taiwan Warns of Own 'Red Line' As China's Military Edges Ever Closer
['Taiwan', 'line', 'defense', 'Beijing', 'Chinese']

Taiwan's defense minister suggested an incursion into the island's 12-nautical mile territorial airspace would warrant a counterstrike.

Taiwan Warns of Own 'Red Line' As China's Military Edges Ever Closer

Taiwan underscored its own "Red line" on Wednesday after its defense minister said Taiwanese forces wouldn't be moved by China's military maneuvers around the island. He told the island's Foreign and National Defense Committee that the previous definition of a "First strike" by Beijing would be expanded to accommodate harassment of Taiwanese territory by Chinese drones as well as the Chinese military moves closer and closer to Taiwan's shores. Chinese military aircraft have also ventured past the Taiwan Strait "Median line" on a near-daily basis. Wu Qian, China's defense ministry spokesperson, told a monthly press conference in late July: "Taiwan is part of China. There is no so-called median line between both sides of the Taiwan Strait." Chiu said Beijing had created "a new normal" with its military activities further in the Taiwan Strait, and it would be a challenge to return to the status quo. The defense official said Taiwan's forces would continue to operate in patrol and training zones east of the median line. China won't have element of surprise in Taiwan invasion-ex-CIA analyst.

Oct. 5, 2022, 11:32 a.m.
AirPods to be made in India for the first time, in Apple's latest diversification move
AirPods to be made in India for the first time, in Apple's latest diversification move
['Apple', 'China', 'manufacturing', 'production', 'Beats']

Some AirPods and Beats headphones are to be made in India for the first time, as Apple continues a gradual reduction in its dependence on China for product manufacturing. AirPods production is predominantly split between Foxconn and Luxshare, and a report tod…

AirPods to be made in India for the first time, in Apple's latest diversification move

Some AirPods and Beats headphones are to be made in India for the first time, as Apple continues a gradual reduction of its dependence on China for product manufacturing. AirPods production is predominantly split between Foxconn and Luxshare, and a report today says that Apple has instructed both companies to move some of their assembly work to India. It's a challenge for the very reason Apple chose China as its manufacturing base in the first place. Apple is asking suppliers to move some AirPods and Beats headphone production to India for the first time, in a win for the South Asia nation as it attempts to rise in the global supply chain. The move is part of Apple's gradual diversification from China, as it looks to lower the risk of supply chain disruptions stemming from the country's strict zero-COVID policy and tensions with the U.S. The report says that Apple has asked them to be ready for Indian production as early as next year. Apple had already moved a significant proportion of AirPods and Beats production from China to Vietnam, and today's report says that the latter country now accounts for the majority of Beats manufacturing. India has become a second major manufacturing hub for Apple, and is expected to be responsible for a full quarter of iPhone production by 2025.

Oct. 5, 2022, 10:30 a.m.
US Government Details Tools Used by APTs in Defense Organization Attack
US Government Details Tools Used by APTs in Defense Organization Attack
['Impacket', 'tool', 'used', 'threat', 'network']

The NSA, FBI and CISA have issued an alert describing the tools and techniques used by advanced persistent threat (APT) actors in an attack aimed at an unnamed defense industrial base organization in the United States. read more

US Government Details Tools Used by APTs in Defense Organization Attack

The NSA, FBI and CISA have issued an alert describing the tools and techniques used by advanced persistent threat actors in an attack aimed at an unnamed defense industrial base organization in the United States. The report published by the three government agencies focuses on some of the tools used by the threat actors. Cybersecurity firm Red Canary has been seeing a significant increase in the use of Impacket - it's one of the hacker tools that is most often present in its customers' environments. "Impacket is a 'dual use' tool in that it is used by legitimate tools as well as by adversaries during intrusions. Adversaries favor Impacket because it allows them to conduct various actions like retrieving credentials, issuing commands, moving laterally, and delivering additional malware onto systems," explained Katie Nickels, director of intelligence at Red Canary. Impacket has been used by well-known threat groups, including the Russia-linked cybercrime gang Wizard Spider and the Chinese state-sponsored group Stone Panda. The second tool highlighted in the alert released by the NSA, FBI and CISA is CovalentStealer, a custom data exfiltration tool that threat actors used to steal sensitive files from the victim's systems. The US government's advisory contains indicators of compromise and other information that defense industrial base and other critical infrastructure organizations are advised to use to detect potential compromise and protect their systems against such threats.

Oct. 5, 2022, 10:04 a.m.
WTO predicts trade growth to slow next year amid crises
WTO predicts trade growth to slow next year amid crises
['Trade', 'year', 'WTO', 'prices', 'countries']

The World Trade Organization is predicting global trade volumes to grow a lackluster 1% next year as higher energy prices, rising interest rates and uncertainties about Chinese manufacturing output amid the lingering COVID-19 pandemic weigh on markets

WTO predicts trade growth to slow next year amid crises

GENEVA - The World Trade Organization is predicting global trade volumes will grow a lackluster 1% next year as crises and challenges weigh on markets, including high energy prices, rising interest rates and uncertainties about Chinese manufacturing output amid the lingering COVID-19 pandemic. The Geneva-based trade body said Wednesday that the amount of goods shipped between countries are expected to rise 3.5% this year, up from the 3% that WTO anticipated in its first forecast for the year in April. This year, the higher predicted increase in trade volumes stems from better data that arrived in the middle of the year, contributing to a clearer forecast, and a boom in trade volumes from oil- and gas-producing countries in the Middle East as supplies from Russia were shunned and consuming countries sought alternative sources, WTO economists say. The trade body said that new information from purchasing managers on final goods prices and an index of input prices suggested that inflationary pressures "May have peaked" - a factor that could influence decision-making from central bankers in the months ahead. Shrinking demand and the continued fallout from the pandemic is likely to crimp exports out of China, the world's manufacturing powerhouse, the WTO said. WTO senior economist Coleman Nee said Russia hasn't reported its trade figures to the global trade body since January, clouding the picture about how Russian trade was faring. The WTO - just one of several multilateral organizations that predicts economic output fluctuations - says it expects global gross domestic product to increase by 2.8% this year and 2.3% next year, down from 3.2% predicted in April. "Most regions are set to register faintly positive export growth in 2023, with the exceptions of Africa and the Middle East, where export growth is projected to turn negative after growing strongly this year on the back of heightened demand for oil," Okonjo-Iweala said.

Oct. 5, 2022, 10:02 a.m.
Amid US-China Tensions, Chinese Media Showcases Advanced Dongfeng Aircraft Carrier Killer Nuclear Missiles
Amid US-China Tensions, Chinese Media Showcases Advanced Dongfeng Aircraft Carrier Killer Nuclear Missiles
['missile', 'series', 'China', 'ballistic', 'Taiwan']

The Chinese media documentary showcased a dozen DF-26B missiles with launchers that pose a threat to the U.S. aircraft carrier strike groups in the region.

Amid US-China Tensions, Chinese Media Showcases Advanced Dongfeng Aircraft Carrier Killer Nuclear Missiles

KEY POINTS China showcased its advanced Dongfeng series missiles. China has set up new missile brigades based on its eastern and southern theater commands, focusing on Taiwan Strait and the South China Sea. The eight-part documentary series, which aired on CCTV "Over the past week," showcased anti-aircraft carrier DF-21D and DF-26B ballistic missiles as well as new-generation DF-41 intercontinental ballistic missiles, which are all part of the Dongfeng series, South China Morning Post reported. The anti-ship missiles would pose a great threat to the U.S. aircraft carrier strike groups in the region. China has set up new missile brigades based in its eastern and southern theater commands, focusing on security in the Taiwan Strait and the South China Sea, a Chinese military source said, as per the outlet. The CCTV documentary series aired in celebration of the 73rd founding anniversary of the PLA and showed at least a dozen DF-26B missiles with launchers, which is equal to an entire missile brigade, according to SCMP. "Showcasing Dongfeng series strategic weapons is a subtle warning to the United States, which is instigating other countries to put on pressure on Beijing over the Taiwan issue," Song Zhongping, a former PLA instructor, said, according to the outlet. Amid the rising tensions between Taiwan and China and following House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's Taipei visit in August, Beijing ordered several days of military drills, during which it fired several ballistic missiles from the Dongfeng series into the waters around Taiwan's northeast and southwest.

Oct. 5, 2022, 10 a.m.
The Chips That Make Taiwan the Center of the World
The Chips That Make Taiwan the Center of the World
['Taiwan', 'China', 'chip', 'TSMC', 'Strait']

The more indispensable TSMC has become to the global economy, the more risk has risen over the future of Taiwan

The Chips That Make Taiwan the Center of the World

"Are your customers concerned," one financial analyst asked Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company chairman Mark Liu last summer, when China from time to time threatens "a war against Taiwan?" CEOs are used to tough questions about capital expenditures and profit margins. The world economy and the supply chains that crisscross Asia and the Taiwan Strait are predicated on this precarious peace. The world's chip industry, as well as the assembly of all the electronic goods chips enable, depends more on the Taiwan Strait and the South China coast than on any other chunk of the world's territory except Silicon Valley. New 5G radio units, for example, require chips from several different firms, many of which are made in Taiwan. In case of a Taiwan crisis, they'd face delays in acquiring the chips their machinery requires. The concentration of semiconductor production in Taiwan also puts the world economy at risk if the "Silicon shield" doesn't deter China. Today Taiwan is within range of far more destructive Chinese forces-not only an array of short- and medium-range missiles, but also aircraft from the Longtian and Huian airbases on the Chinese side of the Strait, from which it's only a seven-minute flight to Taiwan.

Oct. 5, 2022, 10 a.m.
U.S.-China War: A Nuclear Strategy for American Defeat | Opinion
U.S.-China War: A Nuclear Strategy for American Defeat | Opinion
['nuclear', 'weapons', 'China', 'American', 'threat']

The primary deterrent to a Chinese first strike with tactical nuclear weapons is the threat of a second strike with American nukes.

U.S.-China War: A Nuclear Strategy for American Defeat | Opinion

"Credible nuclear threats on behalf of allies and partners, or extended deterrence, will be hard to achieve in a world where China's nuclear weapons pose an increasingly robust threat to the U.S. homeland," Michael O'Hanlon, Melanie Sisson, and Caitlin Talmadge write in "Managing the Risks of U.S.-China War: Implementing a Strategy of Integrated Deterrence." "In fact, China may believe that its more robust nuclear arsenal endows it with greater freedom to engage in aggression as its conventional capabilities also continue to grow, knowing that the United States' long-standing nuclear trump card is likely off the table," they write. Extended deterrence-the threat of American nuclear retaliation to deter attacks on friends and allies-is precisely what kept the peace in, particularly, Western Europe during the Cold War and the Korean peninsula since the mid-1950s. Now, in the post-Cold War period, America faces the prospect of a combined Russian and Chinese nuclear threat, as Richard Fisher of the International Assessment and Strategy Center tells Newsweek. The primary deterrent to a Chinese first strike with tactical nuclear weapons is the threat of a second strike with American nukes. The American arms-control community, arguing that low-yield weapons would make nuclear war more likely, in recent years persuaded American presidents not to build them. President Biden is absolutely committed to a nuclear strategy that can only result in catastrophe for Taiwan-and defeat for the U.S. Gordon G. Chang is the author of The Coming Collapse of China.

Oct. 5, 2022, 9:45 a.m.
Fishermen On The Frontlines Face Beijing's Aggression In South China Sea
Fishermen On The Frontlines Face Beijing's Aggression In South China Sea
['China', 'South', 'Sea', 'region', 'country']

Beijing, which invokes the so-called nine-dash line to justify its claims over the South China Sea, is bullying smaller nations in the region into submission.

Fishermen On The Frontlines Face Beijing's Aggression In South China Sea

As China prowls through the South China Sea, fishermen and their small fishing boats from countries having counter-claims over islands are on the frontlines facing Beijing's wrath. Hundreds of Chinese coast guard and vessels belonging to Beijing's maritime militia in the South China Sea are reportedly attacking fishermen, damaging their boats, and also interfering with the oil and gas exploration and scientific research of countries that have claims in the waters. Beijing, which often invokes the so-called nine-dash line, to justify its claims over the South China Sea, has been seeking to assert its regional supremacy and control the waterways for decades by bullying small nations in the region. Trillions of dollars of cargo trade transit the South China Sea annually. In 2021, China unilaterally announced that it would take punitive measures against foreign fishermen caught operating within its self-claimed jurisdictional waters that extend to most of the South China Sea. As was recently reported, Beijing is paying hundreds of civilian ships and fishing vessels of the maritime militia to drop anchor around the disputed islands in the South China Sea region for months. China's militia ships are used to block the activities of other countries with claims in the South China Sea, a detailed report by the Center for Strategic & International Studies revealed.

Oct. 5, 2022, 9:40 a.m.
Taiwan vows to respond to China's military flight incursions
Taiwan vows to respond to China's military flight incursions
['Taiwan', 'China', 'Chinese', 'missile', 'strike']

Taiwan's defense minister says the island will respond to incursions into its airspace by Chinese warplanes and drones, but gave no details

Taiwan vows to respond to China's military flight incursions

Taiwan's defense minister on Wednesday said the island will respond to incursions into its airspace by Chinese warplanes and drones, but gave no details on specific actions. China stepped up its military exercises, fired missiles into waters near Taiwan and sent warplanes across the dividing line in the Taiwan Strait in response to an August visit to the island by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the highest-ranking American official to visit Taiwan in 25 years. China denies the existence of the median line in the Taiwan Strait and challenged established norms by firing missiles over Taiwan into Japan's exclusive economic zone. Taiwan has thus far responded to Chinese incursions into its air defense identification zone by issuing warnings, scrambling jets and activating anti-air missile defenses. The growing frequency of such incursions has spurred a push in Taiwan to optimize its geographical advantages in resisting a much more powerful foe through asymmetrical warfare, such as the use of mobile weapons systems suited to repelling an invasion force. A former Japanese colony, Taiwan separated from mainland China in 1949 as Mao Zedong's Communists forced Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists to relocate across the 180-kilometer -wide Taiwan Strait. Chen also said Taiwan was firm in safeguarding trade secrets and key national technologies and ensuring its top scientific talent is not poached by China.

Oct. 5, 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Expanding Scholarly Kitchen Translations Collections
Expanding Scholarly Kitchen Translations Collections
['research', 'Policy', 'journal', 'OSTP', 'translation']

Today we announce another round of article translations, this time into Korean, Chinese, and Japanese. The post Expanding Scholarly Kitchen Translations Collections appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.

Expanding Scholarly Kitchen Translations Collections

China, Japan, and Korea all contribute enormously to global research and researchers and librarians in these countries are important stakeholders in scholarly communication. We have chosen to focus on the new developments around the public access policies announced by the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, as these are likely to have global impacts on the way research is made available. Ask The Chefs: OSTP Policy Part I. 묻는다: OSTP 1부. Ask The Chefs: OSTP Policy Part II. 묻는다: OSTP 2부. At the top of the page on our navigation bar you should now see a pull-down menu for translations, which are collected for readers here. We expect to see further translations coming soon, so stay tuned for more. If your company does translation work for researchers and you'd be interested in collaborating with The Scholarly Kitchen to expand. David acquired and managed a suite of research society-owned journals with OUP, and before that was the Executive Editor for Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, where he created and edited new science books and journals, along with serving as a journal Editor-in-Chief. David received his PhD in Genetics from Columbia University and did developmental neuroscience research at Caltech before moving from the bench to publishing.

Oct. 5, 2022, 9:17 a.m.
China bans residents from leaving Xinjiang, just weeks after its last Covid lockdown
China bans residents from leaving Xinjiang, just weeks after its last Covid lockdown
['Xinjiang', 'lockdown', 'Urumqi', 'out', 'home']

China has banned residents from leaving Xinjiang over a Covid-19 outbreak -- just weeks after the far-western region began relaxing restrictions from a stringent extended lockdown, fueling public frustration among those scarred by food shortages and plunging …

China bans residents from leaving Xinjiang, just weeks after its last Covid lockdown

Workers at a vineyard in Korla in Xinjiang's Bayingolin Mongol Autonomous Prefecture undergo Covid testing on August 9. China has banned residents from leaving Xinjiang over a Covid-19 outbreak - just weeks after the far-western region began relaxing restrictions from a stringent extended lockdown, fueling public frustration among those scarred by food shortages and plunging incomes. China is the world's last major economy still enforcing strict zero-Covid measures, which aim to stamp out chains of transmission through border restrictions, mass testing, extensive quarantines, and uncompromising snap lockdowns. The news of the region's shuttered borders dismayed many residents for whom the pain of the last lockdown is still fresh. Many parts of Xinjiang were placed under strict lockdown from August to September, with people in affected areas banned from leaving their homes - causing severe shortages of food, medicine and other basic necessities. By early September, Xinjiang residents - from Urumqi to the cities of Yining and Korla - had taken to social media en masse to cry for help, drawing attention to the pain of the extended lockdowns. This limited reopening only lasted seven days before the regional lockdown was announced - dashing any hope of him leaving Xinjiang.

Oct. 5, 2022, 8:10 a.m.
US navy details response to China's possible blockade of Taiwan
US navy details response to China's possible blockade of Taiwan
['Taiwan', 'Beijing', 'island', 'China', 'blockade']

Washington has the capability to break a possible Chinese naval blockade of Taiwan, Samuel Paparo, US Pacific Fleet Commander, has said Read Full Article at RT.com

US navy details response to China's possible blockade of Taiwan

The US and its allies would be able to break a Chinese naval blockade of Taiwan if Beijing decides to isolate the self-governed island, Admiral Samuel Paparo, the Commander of the US Pacific Fleet, has assured. In August, China staged the largest ever military drills around Taiwan in response to a visit by US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, effectively cutting the island off from the rest of the world for days. An unnamed US official told Nikkei that Beijing could "Essentially blockade Taiwan's access, through the repeated imposition of these kinds of closure areas, legally, safely, and in a way that would be extraordinarily difficult, either for Taiwan or the US, to challenge and to counter." Such an approach would allow China to isolate the island without actually announcing a blockade. US President Joe Biden said on several occasions that America would intervene militarily if Beijing decided to use force to gain control of Taiwan. During an interview with '60 Minutes' on CBS News last month, Biden was asked if "US forces, US men and women would defend Taiwan in the event of a Chinese invasion?" The president responded, by saying "Yes." Taiwan has been self-governed since 1949, but never officially declared independence from China, with Beijing considering it a part of its territory under the One-China policy.